Select Page

Dear Jakin,

I am so proud of your life, your courage, your determination to do good things for The Kingdom of Heaven and your wonderful gifts of leadership, intellect, physical agility, conversation and concern for others.

My hope is that you will continue to cultivate all of these gifts for the Glory of The King of Heaven and earth so that all people that you touch might know that there is a God in Heaven and speak well of Him because of your example.

May your confidence always find its foundation in The Lord and may you always grow in your knowledge and understanding of Him and His ways and may He always guide you and direct your actions.

Please find this collection of quotes and stories of noteworthy men of this world who have also shown great courage under stress, determination to overcome regardless of the odds, great leadership and great confidence in their Creator.

Also you will find some information about the various sources of evil that the world and the devil used and will use to derail the godly from the path…

Always seek The Lord and His righteousness and commit yourself to His glorious care.

Love Dad

Genesis 4:6-7

New Living Translation (NLT)

6 “Why are you so angry?” the Lord asked Cain. “Why do you look so dejected? 7 You will be accepted if you do what is right. But if you refuse to do what is right, then watch out! Sin is crouching at the door, eager to control you. But you must subdue it and be its master.”

A compilation of Stories and wise sayings for young people to understand their historical past from a Christian perspective.

Excerpted from Serenity Seekers, Excerpted from the Patriot Post By Mark Alexander, Excerpted from Ann Coulter and various other online and printed sources.

Compiled by Tyler Rogel

Thomas Jefferson once said, “I prefer dangerous liberty to peaceful servitude.”

CONTENTS:

  1. Manhood defined
  2. The role of Government
  3. Christian Influence in Western Governments
  4. Was Christianity ever supposed to be separated from government
  5. Examples of Repentance by National Figures.

National Repentance and Lincoln’s Faith

  1. America’s Hope has always been set upon The rule of God and the principle that all men are to be treated equally in the eyes of the Law…
  2. Was America Founded as a Christian Nation?
  3. Great Men
  4. Greatest Men! Missionaries of The Kingdom
  5. Christianity and Science
  6. Good Character
  7. Gun Ownership and the Second Amendment
  8. Enter – The Enemy…
  9. Evolution Philosophized
  10. Who are Our Enemies?
  11. The Scourge of Radical Islam
  12. Communism
  13. Debt & Oppressive Taxes
  14. The Energy Crisis?
  15. Healthcare
  16. Welfare – State-Sponsored
  17. Illegal Immigration
  18. Education
  19. The Overpopulation Myth – And Radical Environmentalism
  20. Creation Science – Resources

1.

MANHOOD:

“Manhood and Christ-likeness are synonymous”,

— Ed Cole, Bible Teacher

“Authority flows to him who would take responsibility”,

— Jeff Roper, Foursquare European Missions

One of the best ways to think about being a man isn’t that, “Now I can smoke a cigar,” but to consider the use of dangerous things in proper context. We would never give a child a loaded gun to play with. So now a mark of manhood is not the permission to abuse dangerous substances but rather the ability to use dangerous things in the “correct” way. To never allow yourself to be “out of control” but instead to be able to always be meek, which is defined as: “Power under control”.

Meakness is a mark of manhood. Moses was known as a Meek man…Not “week” man. Remember when confronted as leader of Israel he routed the Amorite Kings.

So now as young men you will be offered many opportunities to abuse dangerous things, whether drugs, or alcohol, or sex, or, for that matter, your own power and influence over those more needy than you in your circle of friends.

The bible tells us to always be sober-minded. So as a man now is the time to be sober-minded in all things, and “do not be mastered” by anything. Sin wants to control you but you must master it.

Be a master over:

Sex:

Song of Solomon 8:4 KJV

“Young women of Jerusalem, swear to me that you will not awaken love or arouse love before its proper time!”

Power:

Matthew 20:25-28 NLV

25 But Jesus called them together and said, “You know that the rulers in this world lord it over their people, and officials flaunt their authority over those under them. 26 But among you it will be different. Whoever wants to be a leader among you must be your servant, 27 and whoever wants to be first among you must become your slave. 28 For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve others and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

Money:

1st Timothy 6:10 NLV

For the love of money is the root of all kinds of evil. And some people, craving money, have wandered from the true faith and pierced themselves with many sorrows.

Matthew 6:31 NAS

“Do not worry then, saying, ‘What will we eat?’ or ‘What will we drink?’ or ‘What will we wear for clothing?’ 32“For the Gentiles eagerly seek all these things; for your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things. 33“But seek first His kingdom and His righteousness, and all these things will be added to you.

Alcohol or any other addictive drugs:

Ephesians 5:18 NLV

“Don’t be drunk with wine, because that will ruin your life. Instead, be filled with the Holy Spirit,”

2.

The Role of Government:

It is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favors.” —

— George Washington

“[A] wise and frugal government… shall restrain men from injuring one another, shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. This is the sum of good government.” —

— Thomas Jefferson”

3.

Christian Influence within Western Governments:

The Founders Reference Biblical Concepts Throughout Their Documents

“Done…the SEVENTEENTH DAY of SEPTEMBER, in the year of our LORD one thousand seven hundred and eighty seven.”

This is the last line of the U.S. Constitution.

A study by Professors Donald S. Lutz and Charles S. Hyneman, titled

“The Relative Influence of European Writers on Late 18th-Century American Political Thought”, published in American Political Science Review, 1984, revealed that after examining nearly 15,000 writings of the 55 writers of the Constitution, including newspaper articles, pamphlets, books and monographs, that the Bible, especially the book of Deuteronomy, contributed 34 percent of all direct quotes made by the Founders.

When indirect Bible citations were included, the percentage rose even higher.

Presiding over the Constitutional Convention was George Washington, who wrote ten days after his Presidential Inauguration to the United Baptist Churches of Virginia, May 10, 1789:

“If I could have entertained the slightest apprehension that the Constitution framed by the Convention, where I had the honor to preside, might possibly endanger the religious rights of any ecclesiastical Society, certainly I would never have placed my signature to it.”

In The Highest Court…

“The power to tax is the power to destroy,” wrote John Marshall, 4th Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, who was born SEPTEMBER 24, 1755. No one had a greater impact on Constitutional Law than John Marshall. Sworn in February 4, 1801, Marshall served 34 years and helped write over 1,000 decisions, including supporting the Cherokee Indian nation to stay in Georgia. During the Revolution, John Marshall fought under Washington and endured the freezing winter at Valley Forge.

The Liberty Bell, according to tradition, cracked tolling at Marshall’s funeral, July 8, 1835.

Chief Justice John Marshall wrote to Jasper Adams, May 9, 1833: “The American population is entirely Christian, and with us Christianity and Religion are identified. It would be strange indeed, if with such a people, our institutions did not presuppose Christianity and did not often refer to it and exhibit relations with it.”

A hundred years after John Marshall’s death, the Supreme Court Building was completed in 1935. Herman A. MacNeil’s marble relief above the east portico prominently features Moses in the center with two stone tablets. Adolph A. Weinman’s marble frieze on the south wall includes Moses holding Hebrew tablets.

Every Supreme Court session opens with the invocation: “God save the United States and this Honorable Court.”

4.

Was Christianity ever supposed to separate from government?

President Thomas Jefferson, author of the phrase “Separation of Church and State,” asked Congress to ratify a treaty with the Kaskaskia Indians, which they did DECEMBER 3, 1803.

Negotiated shortly after the Louisiana Purchase by future President William Henry Harrison, the Kaskaskia Indian Treaty stated:

“And whereas the greater part of the said tribe have been baptized and received into the Catholic Church, to which they are much attached, the United States will give annually, for seven years, one hundred dollars toward the support of a priest of that religion, who will engage to perform for said tribe the duties of his office, and also to instruct as many of their children as possible, in the rudiments of literature, and the United States will further give the sum of three hundred dollars, to assist the said tribe in the erection of a church.”

Later in 1806 and 1807, two similar treaties were made with the Wyandotte and Cherokee tribes. On April 26, 1802, Thomas Jefferson extended a 1787 act of Congress in which special lands were designated:

“For the sole use of Christian Indians and the Moravian Brethren missionaries for civilizing the Indians and promoting Christianity.” On OCTOBER 3, 1789, from the U.S. Capitol in New York City, President George Washington issued the first Proclamation of a National Day of Thanksgiving and Prayer to Almighty God, as just one week earlier the first session of the U.S. Congress successfully approved the First Ten Amendments limiting the power of the Federal Government.

The First Amendment begins:

“Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion, or PROHIBITING THE FREE EXCERCISE THEROF.”

In his Proclamation, President Washington stated:

“Whereas it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the Providence of Almighty God….we may…unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations…and beseech Him to pardon our national and other transgressions, to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our…duties properly…to render our national government a blessing to all the People, by constantly being a government of wise, just and constitutional laws…and to bless them with…peace and concord…and the increase of science…and…to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as He alone knows to be best.”

Addressing the New York Historical Society, 1852, Daniel Webster stated:

“If we and our posterity…live always in the fear of God and shall respect His Commandments…we may have the highest hopes of the future fortunes of our country, but if we neglect religious instruction and authority; violate the rules of eternal justice, trifle with the injunctions of morality, and recklessly destroy the constitution which holds us together, no man can tell how sudden a catastrophe may overwhelm us and bury all our glory in profound obscurity.”

July 28

The 14th Amendment was adopted JULY 28, 1868, because southern States, though forced to end slavery by the 13th Amendment, did not grant citizenship to freed slaves. Southern Democrat Legislatures passed Black Codes and Jim Crow Laws, requiring freed slaves to be “apprenticed” to “employers” and punished any who left.

Illinois Republican Congressman John Farnsworth said March 31, 1871:

“The reason for the adoption [of the 14th Amendment]…was because of…discriminating…legislation of those States…by which they were punishing one class of men under different laws from another class.”

Republican John Bingham of Ohio, who introduced the 14th Amendment,

said: “I repel the suggestion…that the Amendment will…take away from any State any right that belongs to it.”

Yet after the Amendment was ratified, activist Federal Judges, applying evolution to the legal process, did just that, as Thomas Jefferson had forewarned Charles Hammond in 1821:

“The germ of dissolution of our…government is in…the federal judiciary…working like gravity by night and by day, gaining a little today and a little tomorrow…until all shall be usurped from the States.”

The 14th Amendment soon became a door by which Federal Courts took authority over trade disputes, union strikes, and eventually religion, away from States’ jurisdiction.

In his Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833, Justice Joseph Story explained the pre-14th Amendment view of “separation of church and state” was to limit the Federal Government:

“In some of the States, Episcopalians constituted the predominant sect; in other, Presbyterians; in others, Congregationalists; in others, Quakers…The whole power over the subject of religion is left exclusively to the State governments, to be acted upon according to their own sense of justice and the State constitutions.”

When North Carolina was considering ratifying the U.S. Convention, Governor Samuel Johnston argued, July 30, 1788: “The people of Massachusetts and Connecticut are mostly Presbyterians…In Rhode Island, the tenets of the Baptists, I believe, prevail. In New York, they are divided very much; the most numerous are the Episcopalians and the Baptists. In New Jersey, they are as much divided as we are. In Pennsylvania, if any sect prevails more than others, it is that of the Quakers. In Maryland, the Episcopalians are most numerous, though there are other sects. In Virginia, there are many sects…I hope, therefore, that gentlemen will see there is no cause of fear that any one religion shall be exclusively established.”

John Bouvier’s Law Dictionary (Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott Company, 1889) stated in its definition of “Religion”:

“The Christian religion is, of course, recognized by the government, yet…the preservation of religious liberty is left to the States.”

On March 4, 1805, in his Second Inaugural Address, President Thomas Jefferson stated:

“In matters of religion I have considered that its free exercise is placed by the Constitution independent of the powers of the General Government. I have therefore undertaken, on no occasion, to prescribe the religious exercise suited to it; but have left them, as the Constitution found them, under the direction and discipline of state and church authorities by the several religious societies.”

On January 23, 1808, Jefferson wrote to Samuel Miller:

“I consider the government of the United States as interdicted by the Constitution from intermeddling with religious institutions, their doctrines, discipline, or exercises. This results not only from the provision that no law shall be made respecting the establishment or free exercise of religion, but from that also which reserves to the states the powers not delegated to the United States [10th Amendment]. Certainly no power to prescribe any religious exercise, or to assume authority in religious discipline, has been delegated to the General government. It must then rest with the States as far as it can be in any human authority…

I do not believe it is for the interest of religion to invite the civil magistrate to direct its exercises, its discipline, or its doctrines…Every religious society has a right to determine for itself the times for these exercises, and the objects proper for them, according to their own particular tenets.”

Justice Joseph Story continued in his Commentaries:

“Probably at the time of the adoption of the Constitution…the universal sentiment in America was, that Christianity ought to receive encouragement from the state so far as was not incompatible with the private rights of conscience and the freedom of religious worship.

Any attempt to level all religions, and make it a matter of state policy to hold all in utter indifference, would have created universal disapprobation, in not universal indignation.”

July 29

Alexis de Tocqueville was born JULY 29, 1805.

A French social scientist, he traveled the United States in 1831, and wrote a two-part work, Democracy in America (1835, 1840), which has been described as:

“the most comprehensive and penetrating analysis of the relationship between character and society in America that has ever been written.”

In it, de Tocqueville wrote:

“Upon my arrival in the United States the religious aspect of the country was the first thing that struck my attention; and the longer I stayed there, the more I perceived the great political consequences resulting from this new state of things, to which I was unaccustomed.

In France I had almost always seen the spirit of religion and the spirit of freedom marching in opposite directions. But in America I found they were intimately united and that they reigned in common over the same country…” They brought with them…a form of Christianity, which I cannot better describe, than by styling it a democratic and republican religion…From the earliest settlement of the emigrants, politics and religion contracted an alliance which has never been dissolved.”

“Religion in America…must be regarded as the foremost of the political institutions of that country; for if it does not impart a taste for freedom, it facilitates the use of it…This opinion is not peculiar to a class of citizens or a party, but it belongs to the whole nation.” “The sects that exist in the United States are innumerable. They all differ in respect to the worship which is due to the Creator; but they all agree in respect to the duties which are due from man to man. Each sect adores the Deity in its own peculiar manner, but all sects preach the same moral law in the name of God… Moreover, all the sects of the United States are comprised within the great unity of Christianity, and Christian morality is everywhere the same.” “In the United States the sovereign authority is religious…There is no country in the whole world where the Christian religion retains a greater influence than in America…

America is still the place where the Christian religion has kept the greatest real power over men’s souls; and nothing better demonstrates how useful and natural it is to man, since the country where it now has the widest sway is both the most enlightened and the freest.” “In the United States the influence of religion is not confined to the manners, but it extends to the intelligence of the people…Christianity, therefore reigns without obstacle, by universal consent…The Americans combine the notions of Christianity and of liberty so intimately in their minds, that it is impossible to make them conceive the one without the other; and with them this conviction does not spring from that barren traditionary faith which seems to vegetate in the soul rather than to live.”

In Book Two of Democracy in America, de Tocqueville wrote:

“Christianity has therefore retained a strong hold on the public mind in America…In the United States…Christianity itself is a fact so irresistibly established, that no one undertakes either to attack or to defend it.”

In August of 1831, while traveling through Chester County, New York, Alexis de Tocqueville observed a court case:

“While I was in America, a witness, who happened to be called at the assizes of the county of Chester, declared that he did not believe in the existence of God or in the immortality of the soul. The judge refused to admit his evidence, on the ground that the witness had destroyed beforehand all confidence of the court in what he was about to say…

The New York Spectator of August 23d, 1831, relates the fact in the following terms:

‘The court of common pleas of Chester county (New York), a few days since rejected a witness who declared his disbelief in the existence of God. The presiding judge remarked, that he had not before been aware that there was a man living who did not believe in the existence of God; that this belief constituted the sanction of all testimony in a court of justice: and that he knew of no case in a Christian country, where a witness had been permitted to testify without such belief.'”

In his State of the Union Address, JANUARY 25, 1984, President Reagan stated:

“Each day your members observe a 200-year-old tradition meant to signify America is one nation under God. I must ask: If you can begin your day with a member of the clergy standing right here leading you in prayer, then why can’t freedom to acknowledge God be enjoyed again by children in every school room across this land?” A month later in a radio address, February 25, 1984, President Reagan stated: “The First Amendment of the Constitution was not written to protect the people from religion; that amendment was written to protect religion from government tyranny…But now we’re told our children have no right to pray in school.

Nonsense.

The pendulum has swung too far toward intolerance against genuine religious freedom.

It is time to redress the balance. Former Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart noted if religious exercises are held to be impermissible activity in schools, religion is placed at an artificial and state-created disadvantage…Refusal to permit religious exercises is seen not as the realization of state neutrality, but rather as the establishment of a religion of secularism.”

5.

Examples of Repentance by National Figures.

National Repentance and Lincoln’s Faith

During the Civil War, after issuing his Emancipation Proclamation, President Abraham Lincoln set a National Day of Humiliation, Fasting and Prayer, MARCH 30, 1863, stating:

“It is the duty of nations…to own their dependence upon the overruling power of God, to confess their sins…with assured hope that genuine repentance will lead to mercy…

The awful calamity of civil war…may be but a punishment inflicted upon us for our presumptuous sins.”

Lincoln continued:

“We have been the recipients of the choicest bounties of Heaven…We have grown in numbers, wealth and power as no other nation has ever grown. But we have forgotten God.

We have forgotten the gracious Hand which preserved us in peace, and multiplied and enriched and strengthened us; and we have vainly imagined, in the deceitfulness of our hearts, that all these blessings were produced by some superior wisdom and virtue of our own. Intoxicated with unbroken success, we have become too self-sufficient to feel the necessity of redeeming and preserving grace, too proud to pray to the God that made us!

It behooves us then to humble ourselves before the offended Power, to confess our national sins and to pray for…forgiveness.”

The Gettysburg Address cites US as nation “Under God”…

NOVEMBER 19, 1863, Abraham Lincoln delivered his Gettysburg Address where 50,000 soldiers were killed or wounded in a 3 day battle on Novemnber 19, 1863:

“Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth upon this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield…to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live…But…we cannot dedicate…this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it. It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced…That from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure. That we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain-that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom-and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

On SEPTEMBER 21, 1924, America’s 30th President, Calvin Coolidge, addressed the Holy Name Society in Washington, D.C., saying:

“The worst evil that could be inflicted upon the youth of the land would be to leave them without restraint and completely at the mercy of their own uncontrolled inclinations. Under such conditions education would be impossible, and all orderly development intellectually or morally would be hopeless.”

Calvin Coolidge continued:

“The Declaration of Independence…claims…the ultimate source of authority by stating…they were… ‘appealing to the Supreme Judge of the World for the rectitude of’ their ‘intentions.’…The foundations of our independence and our Government rests upon basic religious convictions. Back of the authority of our laws is the authority of the Supreme Judge of the World, to whom we still appeal.” “It seems to me perfectly plain that the authority of law, the right to equality, liberty and property, under American institutions, have for their foundation reverence for God. If we could imagine that to be swept away, these institutions of our American government could not long survive.”

“Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”

Thus began the first of the Ten Amendments, or Bill of Rights, which were approved SEPTEMBER 25, 1789.

George Mason, known as “The Father of the Bill of Rights,” wrote the Virginia Declaration of Rights from which Jefferson drew to write the Declaration of Independence.

George Mason was one of 55 founders who wrote the U.S. Constitution, but was also one of sixteen who refused to sign it because it did not abolish slavery and did not limit the power of the Federal Government.

George Mason joined with Patrick Henry and Samuel Adams to prevent the Constitution from being ratified, as the abuses of King George III’s concentrated power were still fresh.

It was largely through George Mason’s insistence that in the first session of Congress ten limitations or amendments were put on the new Federal Government.

George Mason suggested the wording of the First Amendment be:

“All men have an equal, natural and unalienable right to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience; and that no particular sect or society of Christians ought to be favored or established by law in preference to others.”

— George Mason

God Intervenes on Behalf of Our Military in Our Earliest History

Though the War of 1812 had ended two weeks earlier, news had not yet reached New Orleans and on January 8, 1815, five thousand British soldiers charged in a frontal assault against General Andrew Jackson’s Tennessee and Kentucky sharpshooters.

French pirate Jean Lafitte and his men aided the Americans. In just a half-hour, over two thousand British were killed and only 8 Americans. On JANUARY 8, 1815, General Andrew Jackson wrote to Robert Hays regarding the victorious Battle of New Orleans:

“It appears that the unerring hand of Providence shielded my men from the shower of balls, bombs, and rockets, when every ball and bomb from our guns carried with them a mission of death.” Known as “Old Hickory,” Andrew Jackson commented to Major Dravezac on his confidence before the Battle: “I was sure of success, for I knew that God would not give me previsions of disaster, but signs of victory. He said this ditch can never be passed. It cannot be done.” Andrew Jackson wrote to Secretary of War James Monroe: “Heaven, to be sure, has interposed most wonderfully in our behalf, and I am filled with gratitude, when I look back to what we have escaped.”

“To the distinguished Character of Patriot, it should be our highest Glory to add the more distinguished Character of Christian. The signal Instances of providential Goodness which we have experienced and which have now almost crowned our labours with complete Success, demand from us in a peculiar manner the warmest returns of Gratitude and Piety to the Supreme Author of all Good.”

–George Washington

6.

America’s Hope has always been set upon The rule of God and the principle that all men are to be treated equally in the eyes of the Law…

“An opportunity society awaits us. We need only believe in ourselves and give men and women of faith, courage, and vision the freedom to build it. Let others run down America and seek to punish success. Let them call you greedy for not wanting government to take more and more of your earnings. Let them defend their tombstone society of wage and price guidelines, mandatory quotas, tax increases, planned shortages, and shared sacrifices. We want no part of that mess, thank you very much. We will encourage all Americans—men and women, young and old, individuals of every race, creed, and color—to succeed and be healthy, happy, and whole. This is our goal. We see America not falling behind, but moving ahead; our citizens not fearful and divided, but confident and united by shared values of faith, family, work, neighborhood, peace and freedom.” —Ronald Reagan

Why is Christianity Good for American Society and the entire world for that matter…Why Christians should be active in Politics…

All Civil servants of the state of Pennsylvania were originally required to make this declaration:

‘I do believe in one God, the Creator and Governor of the Universe, the Rewarder of the good and the Punisher of the wicked. And I do acknowledge the Scriptures of the Old and New Testament to be given by Divine Inspiration.’

As put forth by One Benjamin Franklin as governor of the state and signer of it’s constitution.

James Garfield stated July 4, 1876:

“If the next century does not find us a great nation…it will be because those who represent the…morality of the nation do not aid in controlling the political forces. They therefore who are decrying the Christian religion, whose morality is so sublime and pure and which insures to the good eternal happiness, are undermining the solid foundation of morals, the best security for the duration of free governments.”

— Senator Charles Carroll, Nov 4th 1800

(the only Catholic signer of the declaration of Independance)

On NOVEMBER 9, 1954, President Eisenhower addressed the National Conference on the Spiritual Foundation of American Democracy at the Sheraton-Carlton Hotel, Washington D.C.:

“Now Dr. Lowry said something about my having certain convictions as to a God in Heaven and an Almighty power. Well, I don’t think anyone needs a great deal of credit for believing in what seems to me to be obvious…This relationship between a spiritual faith…and our form of government is…so obvious that we should really not need to identify a man as unusual because he recognizes it. Our whole theory of government finally expressed in our Declaration…said…Man is endowed by his Creator…When you come back to it, there is just one thing…man is worthwhile because he was born in the image of his God…Democracy is nothing in the world but a spiritual conviction…that each of us is enormously valuable, because of a certain standing before our own God. Any group that…awakens all of us to these simple things…is, in my mind, a dedicated, patriotic group that can well take the Bible in one hand and the flag in the other, and march ahead.”

John F Kennedy’s Faith,

November 22

Shots rang out as President John F. Kennedy was assassinated NOVEMBER 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas. The youngest President ever elected, he was also the youngest to die, barely serving 1,000 days. The 46-year-old Kennedy was on his way to the Dallas Trade Mart to deliver a speech, in which he prepared to say:

“We in this country, in this generation, are – by destiny rather than choice – the watchmen on the walls of world freedom. We ask, therefore, that we may be worthy of our power and responsibility, that we may exercise our strength with wisdom and restraint, and that we may achieve in our time and for all time the ancient vision of peace on earth, goodwill toward men. That must always be our goal – and the righteousness of our cause must always underlie our strength. For as was written long ago, ‘Except the Lord keep the city, the watchman waketh but in vain.'”

Just three weeks after his Inauguration, February 9, 1961, President Kennedy remarked at a Breakfast for International Christian

Leadership:

“Every President of the United States has placed special reliance upon his faith in God…The guiding principle and prayer of this Nation has been, is now, and shall ever be ‘In God We Trust.'”

Why Our Government depends on self-discipline…

On OCTOBER 11, 1798, President John Adams wrote to the 1st Brigade of the 3rd Division of the Militia of Massachusetts:

“We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion. Avarice, ambition, revenge, or gallantry, would break the strongest cords of our Constitution as a whale goes through a net.”

Adams continued:

“Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”

British Statesman Edmund Burke told the National Assembly, 1791:

“What is liberty without virtue? It is the greatest of all possible evils…madness without restraint.

Men are qualified for civil liberty in exact proportion to their disposition to put moral chains upon their own appetites.”

Edmund Burke continued:

“Society cannot exist, unless a controlling power upon will and appetite be placed somewhere; and the less of it there is within, the more there must be without.”

U.S. Speaker of the House Robert Winthrop stated on May 28, 1849:

“Men, in a word, must be controlled either by a power within them, or a power without them; either by the word of God, or by the strong arm of man; either by the Bible or by the bayonet.”

And it continues…(Our need to be “self”-governed in order to experience a form of national self-government)

Lewis Cass was born OCTOBER 9, 1782. A Brigadier-General in the War of 1812, Lewis Cass was Governor of the Michigan Territory where he made Indian treaties, organized townships and built roads. Appointed Secretary of War by President Andrew Jackson, Lewis Cass was a Senator, Secretary of State for President James Buchanan and the

1848 Democrat Presidential Candidate. The State of Michigan placed his statue in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall.

Lewis Cass stated: “Independent of its connection with human destiny hereafter, the fate of republican government is indissolubly bound up with the fate of the Christian religion, and a people who reject its holy faith will find themselves the slaves of their own evil passions and of arbitrary power.”

In 1846, Lewis Cass wrote from Washington, D.C.: “God, in His providence, has given us a Book of His revealed will…to teach us what we ought to do here, and what we shall be hereafter.”

In a Eulogy for Daniel Webster, December 14, 1852, Lewis Cass stated:”He died in the faith of the Christian – humble, but hopeful – adding another to the long list of eminent men who have searched the Gospel of Jesus Christ, and have found it to be the word and the will of God.”

7.

Was America Founded as a Christian Nation?

“The Hand of providence has been so conspicuous in all this, that he must be worse than an infidel that lacks faith, and more than wicked, that has not gratitude enough to acknowledge his obligations.” –George Washington

July 5

They both served in the Continental Congress. One was elected the second President and the other was elected the third. Once political enemies, they became close friends in later life.

An awe swept America when they both died on the same day, JULY 4, 1826, exactly 50 years since they passed the Declaration of Independence. Their names were John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.

In his Second Annual Message to Congress, December 5, 1826, President John Quincy Adams referred to Jefferson and Adams, stating: “Since your last meeting at this place, the fiftieth anniversary of the day when our independence was declared…two of the principal actors in that solemn scene – the hand that penned the ever-memorable Declaration and the voice that sustained it in debate – were by one summons, at the distance of 700 miles from each other, called before the Judge of All to account for their deeds done upon earth.”President John Quincy Adams added in an Executive Order, July 11,

1826:

“A coincidence…so wonderful gives confidence…that the patriotic efforts of these…men were Heaven directed,

and furnishes a new…hope that the prosperity of these States is under the special protection of a kind Providence.”

Called the “Father of American Medicine,” he signed the Declaration of Independence, was Surgeon General of the Continental Army, and a staff member of the Pennsylvania Hospital, where he opened the first free medical clinic. His name was Benjamin Rush, and he was born JANUARY 4, 1745.

He founded the Philadelphia Bible Society, a Sunday School Union and a Society for the Abolition of Slavery. A proponent of public education, Dr. Benjamin Rush wrote his Thoughts Upon the Mode of Education Proper in a Republic, 1786: “I proceed…to inquire what mode of education we shall adopt so as to secure to the state all of the advantages that are to be derived from the proper instruction of the youth; and here I beg leave to remark that the only foundation for a useful education in a republic is to be laid on the foundation of religion.

Without this there can be no virtue, and without virtue there can be no liberty, and liberty is the object and life of all republican governments.”

“But the religion I mean to recommend in this place is that of the New Testament…

Its doctrines and precepts are calculated to promote the happiness of society and the safety and well-being of civil government.

” Commenting on political candidates, Alexis de Tocqueville wrote in Democracy in America, 1835: “If a political character attacks a (religious) sect, this may not prevent even the partisans of that very sect from supporting him; but if he attacks all the sects together, every one abandons him and he remains alone…Moreover, all the sects of the United States are comprised within the great unity of Christianity.”

Earlier, as U.S. Congressman chairing the Committee on Appropriations, James Garfield stated July 4, 1876: “If the next century does not find us a great nation…it will be because those who represent the…morality of the nation do not aid in controlling the political forces.”

Did you know that 52 of the 55 signers of The Declaration of Independence were orthodox, deeply committed Christians? The other three all believed in the Bible as the divine truth, the God of scripture, and His personal intervention. The 55 writers of the U.S. Constitution consisted of: 26 Episcopalians, 11 Presbyterians, 7 Congregationalists, 2 Lutherans, 2 Dutch Reformed, 2 Methodists, 2 Roman Catholics, 2 Quakers and 1 Deist

– Dr. Franklin, who called for prayer during the Constitutional Convention, June 28, 1787:

“I therefore beg leave to move – that henceforth prayers imploring the assistance of Heaven, and its blessing on our deliberations, be held in this Assembly every morning.”

The Journal of the U.S. House of Representatives, March 27, 1854, recorded the unanimous vote of the 33rd Congress to print Congressman James Meacham’s report, which stated:

“At the adoption of the Constitution, we believe every State – certainly 10 of the 13 – provided as regularly for the support of the Church as for the support of the Government…Down to the Revolution, every colony did sustain religion in some form. It was deemed peculiarly proper that the religion of liberty should be upheld by a free people.” “Had the people, during the Revolution, had a suspicion of any attempt to war against Christianity, that Revolution would have been strangled in its cradle.”

Benjamin Franklin:

On JULY 26, 1775, Benjamin Franklin became the first U.S. Postmaster General, a position he held prior to the Revolution under the British Crown.

Franklin’s public career began when organized Pennsylvania’s first volunteer militia during threatend Spanish and French attacks, and proposed a General Fast, which was approved by the Colony’s Council and printed in the Pennsylvania Gazette, December 12, 1747:

“Forasmuch as it is the Duty of mankind, on all suitable occasions to acknowledge their dependence on the Divine Being, to give Thanks for the Mercies received, and no less to deprecate his Judgments and humbly pray for his Protection; And as the calamities of a bloody War, in which our Nation is now engaged, seem every Year more nearly to approach us, and the Expedition form’d for the security of these Plantation hath been laid aside,

As the Inhabitants of this Province & City have been sorely visited with mortal sickness in the Summer past, & there is just reason to fear that unless we humble ourselves before the Lord & amend our Ways, we may be chastized with yet heavier Judgments, We have, therefore, thought fit, on due consideration thereof, to appoint Thursday, the 7th Day of January next, to be observed throughout this Province as a Day of Fasting & Prayer, exhorting all, both Ministers & People, to observe the same with becoming seriousness & attention, & to join with one accord in the most humble & fervent Supplications;

That Almighty God would mercifully interpose and still the Rage of War among the Nations & put a stop to the effusion of Christian Blood;…That he would take this Province under his Protection, Confound the designs and defeat the Attempts of its Enemies…It is recommended to all Persons to abstain from servile Labour on the said Day.”

Franklin published the sermons of Evangelist George Whitefield, which helped spread The Great Awakening Revival.

He established a volunteer fire department, a circulating public library, an insurance company, a city police force, a night watch and a hospital.

He set up the lighting of city streets and coined the electrical terms “positive” and “negative.”

On September 28, 1776, as Governor of Pennsylvania, Benjamin Franklin signed the State’s first Constitution, which stated:

“Nor can any man, who acknowledges the being of a God, be justly deprived or abridged of any civil right…And each member, before he takes his seat, shall make and subscribe the following declaration,

viz:

‘I do believe in one God, the Creator and Governor of the Universe, the Rewarder of the good and the Punisher of the wicked. And I do acknowledge the Scriptures of the Old and New Testament to be given by Divine Inspiration.’

And no further or other religious test shall ever hereafter be required of any civil officer or magistrate in this State.”

At the end of the Revolutionary War, Franklin signed the Treaty of Paris, September 3, 1783, which began: “In the name of the Most Holy and Undivided Trinity…”

As Governor of Pennsylvania, Benjamin Franklin hosted the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, where on June 28, 1787, he

moved:

“That henceforth prayers imploring the assistance of Heaven, and its blessing on our deliberations, be held in this Assembly every morning.”

Franklin wrote April 17, 1787: “Only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters.”

Benjamin Franklin wrote his epitaph:

“THE BODY of BENJAMIN FRANKLIN – Printer. Like the cover of an old book, Its contents torn out, And stripped of its lettering and gilding, Lies here, food for worms; Yet the work itself shall not be lost, For it will (as he believed) appear once more, In a new, And more beautiful edition, Corrected and amended By The AUTHOR.”

Until 1937, MARCH 4th was Inauguration Day, as March was the first month of the year in Protestant Europe and Colonial America from the Middle Ages till 1752, when it adopted the Catholic Gregorian Calendar changing the first month of the year to January.

Each President acknowledged faith upon assuming office, for example, President John Adams in March 4, 1797 gave:

“Veneration for the religion of a people who profess and call themselves Christians…to consider a decent respect for Christianity among the best recommendations for the public service.”

In March 4, 1809, President James Madison referred to the:

“Guidance of that Almighty Being.”

President John Quincy Adams stated in March 4, 1825:

“‘Except the Lord keep the city, the watchman waketh in vain.'”

In March 4, 1841, President William Harrison said:

“I deem the present occasion sufficiently important…in expressing to my fellow citizens a profound reverence for the Christian religion.”

President Franklin Pierce, in March 4, 1853, stated:

“There is no national security but in the nation’s humble, acknowledged dependence upon God.”

President James Buchanan, March 4, 1857, said:

“Cultivate peace…with all nations…in a spirit of Christian benevolence.”

In March 4, 1861, Abraham Lincoln wrote:

“Intelligence, patriotism, Christianity, and a firm reliance on Him who has never yet forsaken this favored land, are still competent to adjust in the best way all our present difficulty.”

President Calvin Coolidge said in March 4, 1925:

“America…cherishes no purpose save to merit the favor of Almighty God.”

October 13

Margaret Thatcher was born OCTOBER 13, 1925.

She was the first woman Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. While traveling through New York City in 1996, Margaret Thatcher had an interview with Joseph A. Cannon, which was printed in Human Events. The Decalogue-Ten Commandments-are addressed to each and every person. This is the origin of our common humanity and of the sanctity of the individual. Each one has a duty to try to carry out those commandments. You don’t get that in any other political creed…It is personal liberty with personal responsibility. Responsibility to your parents, to your children, to your God. This really binds us together in a way that nothing else does.

If you accept freedom, you’ve got to have principles about the responsibility. You can’t do this without a biblical foundation. Margaret Thatcher concluded regarding America: “Your Founding Fathers came over with that. They came over with the doctrines of the New Testament as well as the Old. They looked after one another, not only as a matter of necessity, but as a matter of duty to their God. There is no other country in the world which started that way.”

Should the Bible be included in our state-run education system?

John Quincy Adams continued:

“So great is my veneration for the Bible, and so strong my belief, that when duly read and meditated on, it is of all books in the world, that which contributes most to make men good, wise, and happy-that the earlier my children begin to read it…the more lively and confident will be my hopes that they will prove useful citizens of their country.”

Our 12th US President Zackary Taylor.

“Old Rough and Ready” died JULY 9, 1850.

This was General Zachary Taylor.

He fought the British in the War of 1812, the Sac Indians in the Black Hawk War and the Seminole Indians in Florida.

Zachary Taylor’s victories in the Mexican War, being greatly outnumbered by Santa Anna’s forces, made him a national hero. Zachary Taylor was elected the 12th U.S. President.

Presented with a Bible by a delegation of ladies from Frankfort, Kentucky, President Zachary Taylor’s acknowledgment was printed in the Frankfort Commonwealth, February 21, 1849:

“I accept with gratitude…your gift of this inestimable Volume. It was for the love of the truths of this great Book that our fathers abandoned their native shores for the wilderness. Animated by its lofty principles they toiled and suffered till the desert blossomed as a rose.” “The same truths sustained them…to become a free nation; and guided by the wisdom of this Book they founded a government.”

Refusing to be sworn in on the Sabbath, President Zachary Taylor told a Sabbath-School celebration in the City of Washington, July 4, 1849:

“The only ground of hope for the continuance of our free institutions is in the proper moral and religious training of the children.”

A peer of Mozart and Haydn, he started becoming deaf at age 28, yet incredibly wrote some of the world’s most beautiful symphonies, concertos and sonatas. This was Ludwig van Beethoven, baptized DECEMBER 17, 1770, in Bonn, Germany.

“Alle Menschen werden Bruder Wo dein sanfter Flitgel weilt.” (“All mankind shall be brothers where thy gentle wings abide.”) Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy” is also used as the tune of Princeton professor Henry Van Dyke’s hymn “Joyful, Joyful We Adore Thee.”

In 1801, Beethoven, being deaf, wrote:

“No friend have I. I must live by myself alone; but I know well that God is nearer to me than others in my art, so I will walk fearlessly with Him.” Supreme Court Justice Jackson wrote in McCollum v. Board of Education, 1948: “It would not seem practical to teach…the arts if we are to forbid exposure of youth to any religious influences.

Music without sacred music…would be…incomplete, even from a secular point of view.”

The Continental Congress Sets Out to Evangelize the Nation:

It is the same congress that formed the American Bible Society. Immediately after creating the Declaration of Independence, the Continental Congress voted to purchase and import 20,000 copies of scripture for the people of this nation.

Patrick Henry – In Context…

Patrick Henry, who is called the firebrand of the American Revolution, is still remembered for his words, ‘Give me liberty or give me death.’ But in current textbooks, the context of these words is deleted. Here is what he said: ‘An appeal to arms and the God of hosts is all that is left us. But we shall not fight our battle alone. There is a just God that presides over the destinies of nations. The battle sir, is not of the strong alone. Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it almighty God. I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death.’

These sentences have been erased from our textbooks.

Was Patrick Henry a Christian? The following year, 1776, he wrote this ‘It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this great nation was founded not by religionists, but by Christians; not on religion, but on the Gospel of Jesus Christ. For that reason alone, people of other faiths have been afforded freedom of worship here.’

Was Jefferson a Christian?

Consider these words that Thomas Jefferson wrote on the front of his well- worn Bible: ‘I am a Christian, that is to say a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus. I have little doubt that our whole country will soon be rallied to the unity of our Creator and, I hope, to the pure doctrine of Jesus also.’

“Can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are the gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with his wrath? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just: that his justice cannot sleep for ever.” –Thomas Jefferson

“Adore God. Reverence and cherish your parents. Love your neighbor as yourself, and your country more than yourself. Be just. Be true. Murmur not at the ways of Providence.” —Thomas Jefferson

No nation has ever existed or been governed without religion. Nor can be. The Christian religion is the best religion that has been given to man and I, as Chief Magistrate of this nation, am bound to give it the sanction of my example.

Was George Washington a Christian?

Consider these words from his personal prayer book: ‘Oh, eternal and everlasting God, direct my thoughts, words and work. Wash away my sins in the immaculate blood of the lamb and purge my heart by the Holy Spirit. Daily, frame me more and more in the likeness of thy son, Jesus Christ, that living in thy fear, and dying in thy favor, I may in thy appointed time obtain the resurrection of the justified unto eternal life. Bless, O Lord, the whole race of mankind and let the world be filled with the knowledge of thy son, Jesus Christ.

Consider these words from George Washington, the Father of our Nation, in his farewell speech on September 19, 1796:

‘It is impossible to govern the world without God and the Bible. Of all the dispositions and habits that lead to political prosperity, our religion and morality are the indispensable supporters. Let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Reason and experience both forbid us to expect that our national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.’

“To the distinguished Character of Patriot, it should be our highest Glory to add the more distinguished Character of Christian. The signal Instances of providential Goodness which we have experienced and which have now almost crowned our labours with complete Success, demand from us in a peculiar manner the warmest returns of Gratitude and Piety to the Supreme Author of all Good.” –George Washington

Here is the daily prayer of Our Founder and First President George Washington:

“Almighty God, we make our earnest prayer that thou wilt keep the United States in Thy holy protection: that Thou wilt incline the hearts of the citizens to cultivate a spirit of subordination and obedience to government and, and entertain a brotherly affection and love for one another and for their fellow citizens of the United States at large. And finally that Thou wilt most graciously be pleased to dispose us all to do justice, to love mercy, and to demean ourselves with that charity, humility, and pacific temper of mind which were characteristics of the Divine author of our blessed religion, and without a humble imitation of whose example in these things we can never hope to be a happy nation. Grant our supplication, we beseech Thee, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

Was Thomas Paine a Christian?

After the Continental Army was driven out of New Jersey, an article titled “The American Crisis” was published in the Pennsylvania Journal, DECEMBER 23, 1776. Written by an aide-de-camp to General Nathanael Greene named Thomas Paine, General Washington ordered it read to the troops:

“These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country…Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.” “What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly….Heaven knows how to put a price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as freedom should not be highly rated…God Almighty will not give up a people to military destruction…who have so earnestly…sought to avoid the calamities of war.” “The whole English army, after ravaging the kingdom of France, was driven back…by a few broken forces headed by a woman, Joan of Arc.

Would that heaven might inspire some Jersey maid to spirit up her countrymen…’Show your faith by your works,’ that God may bless you…I thank God, that I fear not.”

— Thomas Paine

Was John Adams a Christian?

Consider these words by John Adams, our second president, who also served as chairman of the American Bible Society.

In an address to military leaders he said, ‘We have no government armed with the power capable of contending with human passions, unbridled by morality and true religion. Our constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.’

“The foundation of national morality must be laid in private families. … Public virtue cannot exist in a nation without private, and public virtue is the only foundation of republics.” –John Adams

Was the Supreme Court Christian-influenced?

How about our first Court Justice, John Jay?

He stated that when we select our national leaders, if we are to preserve our Nation, we must select Christians. ‘Providence has given to our people the choice of their rulers and it is the duty as well as the privilege and interest of our Christian Nation to select and prefer Christians for their rulers.’

Was John Quincy Adams a Christian?

John Quincy Adams, son of John Adams, was the sixth U.S. President.

He was also the chairman of the American Bible Society, (which he considered his highest and most important role). On July 4, 1821, President Adams said, ‘The highest glory of the American Revolution was this: it connected in one indissoluble bond the principles of civil government with the principles of Christianity.’

Calvin Coolidge a Christian?

Calvin Coolidge, our 30th President of the United States reaffirmed this truth when he wrote,

‘The foundations of our society and our government rest so much on the teachings of the Bible that it would be difficult to support them if faith in these teachings would cease to be practically universal in our country.’

Was the United States Congress Christian?

In 1782, the United States Congress voted this resolution: ‘The congress of the United States recommends and approves the Holy Bible for use in all schools.’

Should the Bible be Taught to Schoolchildren in the U.S.?

William Holmes McGuffey is the author of the McGuffey Reader, which was used for over 100 years in our public schools with over 125 million copies sold until it was stopped in 1963. President Lincoln called him the ‘Schoolmaster of the Nation.’

Listen to these words of Mr. McGuffey:

‘The Christian religion is the religion of our country. From it are derived our notions on character of God, on the great moral Governor of the universe. On its doctrines are founded the peculiarities of our free institutions. From no source has the author drawn more conspicuously than from the sacred Scriptures. From all these extracts from the Bible I make no apology.’

What about the Separation of Church and State and Whether Our Institutions Should Study the Scriptures?

1st Amendment State:

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people  peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Of the first 108 universities founded in America, 106 were distinctly Christian, including the first. Harvard University, chartered in 1636. In the original Harvard Student Handbook, rule number 1 was that students seeking entrance must know Latin and Greek so that they could study the scriptures:

‘Let every student be plainly instructed and earnestly pressed to consider well, the main end of his life and studies is, to know God and Jesus Christ, which is eternal life, John 17:3; and therefore to lay Jesus Christ as the only foundation of all sound knowledge and learning. And seeing the Lord only giveth wisdom, let everyone seriously set himself by prayer in secret to seek it of him (Proverbs 2:3).’

For over 100 years, more than 50% of all Harvard graduates were pastors!William Orville Douglas died JANUARY 19, 1980.

He was a Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court for 36 years, after having taught law at Yale and Columbia University. In the 1952 case of Zorach v. Clauson, Justice Douglas wrote:

“The First Amendment, however, does not say that in every and all respects there shall be a separation of Church and State Otherwise the state and religion would be aliens to each other- hostile, suspicious, and even unfriendly. We are a religious people whose institutions presuppose a Supreme Being. When the state encourages religious instruction…it follows the best of our traditions. For it then respects the religious nature of our people and accommodates the public service to their spiritual needs.

To hold that it may not would be to find in the Constitution a requirement that the government show a callous indifference to religious groups. That would be preferring those who believe in no religion over those who do believe. We find no constitutional requirement which makes it necessary for government to be hostile to religion…We cannot read into the Bill of Rights such a philosophy of hostility to religion.”

Note the Following Christian Reference in the Preambles for ALL 50 States of the Union!

Alabama 1901, Preamble We the people of the State of Alabama, invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God, do ordain and establish the following Constitution.

Alaska 1956, Preamble We, the people of Alaska, grateful to God and to those who founded our nation and pioneered this great land.

Arizona 1911, Preamble We, the people of the State of Arizona, grateful to Almighty God for our liberties, do ordain this Constitution…

Arkansas 1874, Preamble We, the people of the State of Arkansas, grateful to Almighty God for the privilege of choosing our own form of government…

California 1879, Preamble We, the people of the State of California, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom…

Colorado 1876, Preamble We, the people of Co lorado, with profound reverence for the Supreme Ruler of Universe…

Connecticut 1818, Preamble. The People of Connecticut, acknowledging with gratitude the good Providence of God in permitting them to enjoy.

Delaware 1897, Preamble Through Divine Goodness all men have, by nature, the rights of worshipping and serving their Creator according to the dictates of their consciences.

Florida 1885, Preamble We, the people of the State of Florida, grateful to Almighty God for our constitutional liberty, establish this Constitution…

Founding State: Georgia 1777, Preamble We, the people of Georgia, relying upon protection and guidance of Almighty God, do ordain and establish this Constitution…

Hawaii 1959, Preamble We, the people of Hawaii , Grateful for Divine Guidance .. Establish this Constitution.

Idaho 1889, Preamble We, the people of the State of Idaho, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, to secure its blessings.

Illinois 1870, Preamble We, the people of the State of Illinois, grateful to Almighty God for the civil , political and religious liberty which He hath so long permitted us to enjoy and looking to Him f or a blessing on our endeavors.

Indiana 1851, Preamble We, the People of the State of Indiana , grateful to Almighty God for the free exercise of the right to choose our form of government.

Iowa 1857, Preamble We, the People of the State of Iowa, grateful to the Supreme Being for the blessings hit her t o enjoyed, and feeling our dependence on Him for a c ontinuation of these blessings, establish this Constitution

Kansas 1859, Preamble We, the people of Kansas , grateful to Almighty God for our civil and religious privileges establish this Constitute on.

Kentucky 1891, Preamble. We, the people of the Commonwealth are grateful to Almighty God for the civil, political and religious liberties…

Louisiana 1921, Preamble We, the peop le of the State of Louisiana , grateful to Almighty God for the civi l, political and religious liberties we enjoy.

Maine 1820, Preamble We the People of Maine acknowledging with grateful hearts the goodness of the Sovereign Ruler of the Universe in affording us an opportunity … And imploring His aid and direction.

Founding State: Maryland 1776, Preamble We, the people of the state of Maryland , grateful to Almighty God for our civil and religious liberty…

Founding State: Massachusetts 1780, Preamble We…the people of Massachusetts, acknowledg ing with grateful hearts, the goodness of the Great Legislator of the Universe In the course of His Providence, an opportunity and devoutly imploring His direction

Michigan 1908, Preamble We, the people of the State of Michigan , grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of freedom establish this Constitution.

Minnesota, 1857, Preamble We, the people of the State of Minnesota, grateful to God for our civil and religious liberty, and desiring to perpetuate its blessings: < /STRONG>

Mississippi 1890, Preamble We, the people of Mississippi in convention assembled, grateful to Almighty God, and invoking His blessing on our work.

Missouri 1845, Preamble We, the people of Missouri , with profound reverence for the Supreme Ruler of the Universe, and grateful for His goodness . Establish this Constitution.

Montana 1889, Preamble. We, the people of Montana , grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of liberty establish this Constitution.

Nebraska 1875, Preamble We, the people, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom . Establish this Constitution.

Nevada 1864, Preamble We the people of the State of Nevada , grateful to Almighty God for our if! Freedom, establish this20Constitution…

Founding State: New Hampshire 1792, Part I. Art. I. Sec. V Every individual has a natural and unalienable right to worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience.

New Jersey 1844, Preamble We, the people of the State of New Jersey, grateful to Almighty God for civil and religious liberty which He hath so20long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to Him for a blessing on our endea vors.

New Mexico 1911, Preamble We, the People of New Mexico, grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of liberty..

New York 1846, Preamble We, the people of the State of New York, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, in order to secure its blessings.

North Carolina 1868, Preamble &n bsp;We the people of the State of North Carolina, grateful to Almighty God, the Sovereign Ruler of Nations, for our civil, political, and religious liberties, an d ackn owledging our dependence up on Him for the continuance of those…

North Dakota 1889, Preamble We, the people of North Dakota , grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of civil and religious liberty, do ordain…

Ohio 1852, Preamble We the people of the state of Ohio, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, to secure its blessings and to promote our20common…

Oklahoma 1907, Preamble Invoking the guidance of Almighty God, in order to secure and perpetuate the blessings of liberty, establish this

Oregon 1857, Bill of Rights, Article I Section 2. All men shall be secure in the Natural right, to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their consciences

Founding State: Pennsylvania 1776, Preamble We, the people of Pennsylvania, grateful to Almighty God for the blessings of civil and religious liberty, and humbly invoking His guidance…

Rhode Island 1842, Preamble. We the People of the State of Rhode Island grateful to Almighty God for the civil and religious liberty which He hath so long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to Him for a blessing…

Founding State: South Carolina, 1778, Preamble We, the people of he State of South Carolina grateful to God for our liberties, do ordain and establish this Constitution.

South Dakota 1889, Preamble We, the people of South Dakota, grateful to Almighty God for our civil and religious liberties.

Founding State: Tennessee 1796, Art. XI.III. That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their conscience…

Texas 1845, Preamble We the People of the Republic of Texas, acknowledging, with gratitude, the grace and beneficence of God.

Utah 1896, Preamble Grateful to Almighty God for life and liberty, we est ablish this

Constitution.

Founding State: Vermont 1777, Preamble Whereas all government ought to enable the individuals who compose it to enjoy their natural rights, and other blessings which the Author of Existence has bestowed on man.

Founding State: Virginia 1776, Bill of Rights, XVI Religion, or the Duty which we owe our Creator can be directed only by Reason and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian Forbearance, Love and Charity towards each other

Washington 1889, Preamble We the People of the State of Washington, grateful to the Supreme Ruler of the Universe for our liberties, do ordain this Constitution

West Virginia 1872, Preamble Since through Divine Providence we enjoy the blessings of civil, political and religious liberty, we, the people of West Virginia reaffirm our faith in and constant reliance upon God ..

Wisconsin 1848, Preamble We, the people of Wisconsin, grateful to Almighty God for our fr eedom, domestic tranquility…

Wyoming 1890, Preamble We, the people of the State of Wyoming, grateful to God for our civil, political, and religious liberties, establish this Constitution.

(Please note that at no time is anyone told that they MUST worship God.)

“Those people who will not be governed by God will be ruled by tyrants.” – William Penn

8.

Great Men

July 18

George Washington:

Prior to the Revolution, British troops were marching toward Fort Duquesne when they were ambushed, July 9, 1755, by the French and Indians. Not accustomed to fighting unless in an open field, the British soldiers were annihilated. 23-year-old Colonel George Washington rode back and forth during the battle delivering orders for General Edward Braddock.

Eventually, Braddock was killed and every officer on horseback was shot, except Washington.

From Fort Cumberland, George Washington wrote of the Battle of Monongahela to his younger brother, John Augustine Washington, JULY 18, 1755:

“As I have heard, since my arrival at this place, a circumstantial account of my death and dying speech, I take this early opportunity of contradicting the first, and of assuring you, that I have not as yet composed the latter. But by the All-Powerful Dispensations of Providence, I have been protected beyond all human probability or expectation; for I had four bullets through my coat, and two horses shot under me, yet escaped unhurt, although death was leveling my companions on every side of me!”

An Indian warrior later declared:

“Washington was never born to be killed by a bullet! I had seventeen fair fires at him with my rifle and after all could not bring him to the ground!”

May 13

Reverend Robert Hunt:

The first permanent English settlement in the New World began at Jamestown, Virginia, MAY 13, 1607. Plagued by hunger, malaria, exposure and Indian attacks, many of the 100 settlers sent out by the London Company died, including their minister Robert Hunt, of whom they wrote: “1607. To the glory of God and in memory of the Reverend Robert Hunt, Presbyter, appointed by the Church of England. Minister of the Colony which established the English Church and English Civilization at Jamestown…His people, members of the Colony, left this testimony concerning him. Rev. Robert Hunt was an honest, religious and courageous Divine. He preferred the Service of God in so good a voyage to every thought of ease at home. He endured every privation, yet none ever heard him repine.

During his life our factions were ofte healed, and our greatest extremities so comforted that they seemed easy in comparison with what we endured after his memorable death. We all received from him the Holy Communion together, as a pledge of reconciliation, for we all loved him for his exceeding goodness.” Ending their tribute to Rev. Robert Hunt, Virginia’s first settlers

wrote: “He planted the first Protestant Church in America and laid down his life in the foundation of America.”

July 23

Roger Sherman was the only person to sign all four of America’s founding documents:

Articles of Association-1774, Declaration of Independence-1776, Articles of Confederation-1777, and U.S. Constitution-1787.

At age 19, Roger Sherman’s father died and he supported his family as a shoe cobbler, helping two younger brothers attend college and become clergymen.

Roger Sherman was a surveyor and merchant, but when a neighbor needed legal advice, he studied to help, only to be inspired to be a lawyer. Roger Sherman was elected a state senator, a judge and a delegate to the Continental Congress. He helped draft the Declaration of Independence and gave instructions to an embassy to Canada:

“That all civil rights and the right to hold office were to be extended to persons of any Christian denomination.”

Roger Sherman made 138 speeches at the Constitutional Convention, and in the first session of Congress, thought a First Amendment unnecessary, as religion was under each individual States’ jurisdiction.

Elected a U.S. Senator at age 70, Roger Sherman died JULY 23, 1793.

Inscribed on his tomb is:

“He ever adorned the profession of Christianity which he made in youth and…died in the prospect of a blessed immortality.”

July 19

“V” for Victory! It was on JULY 19, 1941, that British Prime Minister Winston Churchill held up two fingers as a sign of victory. It became a symbol for all Western European resistance during WWII, with V signs painted on walls and over Nazi posters.

Winston Churchill, in From War to War, (Second World War, 1958, Vol.1, ch. 4, p. 50) described Hitler’s Mein Kampf as: “…the new Koran of faith and war: turgid, verbose, shapeless, but pregnant with its message.” Before the House of Commons, June 18, 1940, Churchill warned: “I expect that the Battle of Britain is about to begin. Upon this battle depends the survival of Christian civilization…The whole fury and might of the enemy must very soon be turned on us. Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this Island or lose the war.” “If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be free and the life of the world may move forward into broad, sunlit uplands. But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science.” “Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, ‘This was their finest hour.'”

Earlier in his career, 1897-1898, Winston Churchill fought in northwest India, Egypt and Sudan, serving under the command of General Herbert Kitchener.

Churchill returned to Britain and penned a two-volume work, The (Nile) River War, in which he wrote: “How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries!…The fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog…Insecurity of property exist wherever the followers of the Prophet rule or live…

A degraded sensualism deprives this life of its grace and refinement; the next of its dignity and sanctity. The fact that in Mohammedan law every woman must belong to some man as his absolute property, either as a child, a wife, or a concubine, must delay the final extinction of slavery until the faith of Islam has ceased to be a great power among men.

Individual Moslems may show splendid qualities…but the influence of the religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith. It has already spread throughout Central Africa, raising fearless warriors at every step; and were it not that Christianity is sheltered in the strong arms of science, the science against which it had vainly struggled, the civilisation of modern Europe might fall, as fell the civilisation of ancient Rome.”

As quoted by Stanely Kurtz in “Tribes of Terrorâ” (Claremont Review, 2007/2008), Churchill described Islam as a “system of ethics, which regards treachery and violence as virtues rather than vices.”

February 4. Quoting Jimmy Carter re: Dietrich Bonhoffer, in his book Sources of Strength, 1997, wrote: “Rev. Niebuhr urged Dietrich Bonhoeffer to remain in America for his own safety. Bonhoeffer refused. He felt he had to be among the other Christians persecuted in Germany. So he returned home, and…in resistance to Hitler…preached publicly against Nazism, racism, and anti-Semitism…Bonhoeffer was finally arrested and imprisoned. Born FEBRUARY 4, 1906, he died April 9, 1945, just a few days before the allied armies liberated Germany.

He was executed on orders of Heinrich Himmler. He died a disciple and a martyr.”

Jimmy Carter concluded: “The same Holy Spirit…that gave Bonhoeffer the strength to stand up against Nazi tyranny is available to us today.” On February 16, 2002, Dr. James Dobson told the National Religious Broadcasters: “Those of you who feel that the church has no responsibility in the cultural area…What if it were 1943 and you were in Nazi Germany and you knew what Hitler was doing to the Jews…Would you say, ‘We’re not political-that’s somebody else’s problem’?” Dobson concluded: “I thank God Dietrich Bonhoeffer did not give that answer, and he was arrested by the Nazis and hanged in 1945, naked and alone because he said, ‘This is not right.'”

February 3

On the frigid night of FEBRUARY 3, 1943, the Allied ship Dorchester plowed through the waters near Greenland. At 1:00am, a Nazi submarine fired a torpedo into its flank, killing many in the explosion and trapping others below deck. It the ensuing chaos, four chaplains: a priest, a rabbi and two protestant ministers; distributed life jackets. When there were none left, the four chaplains ripped off their own jackets and put them on four young men. Standing embraced on the slanting deck, the chaplains bowed their heads in prayer as they sank to their icy deaths. Congress honored them by declaring this “Four Chaplains Day.”

On February 7, 1954, President Dwight Eisenhower remarked:

“And we remember that, only a decade ago, aboard the transport Dorchester, four chaplains of four faiths together willingly sacrificed their lives so that four others might live.

In the three centuries that separate the Pilgrims of the Mayflower from the chaplains of the Dorchester, America’s freedom, her courage, her strength, and her progress have had their foundation in faith. Today as then, there is need for positive acts of renewed recognition that faith is our surest strength, our greatest resource.”

January 3

Frederick the Great of Prussia called these ten days “the most brilliant in the world’s history.”

After winning the Battle of Trenton, Christmas night, George Washington’s small force met General Cornwallis’ 8,000 man British army. The night before the battle, Washington left his campfires burning and silently marched his army around the back of the British camp at Princeton, New Jersey. At daybreak, JANUARY 3, 1777, Washington attacked, capturing three regiments of British troops. Enthusiasm swept America.

Yale President Ezra Stiles stated in an Election Address before the Governor and General Assembly of Connecticut: “In our lowest and most dangerous state, in 1776 and 1777, we sustained ourselves against the British Army of 60.000 troops, commanded by…the ablest generals Britain could procure throughout Europe, with a naval force of 22,000 seamen in above 80 men-of-war. Who but a Washington, inspired by Heaven, could have conceived the surprise move upon the enemy at Princeton-or that Christmas eve when Washington and his army crossed the Delaware?” “The United States are under peculiar obligations to become a holy people unto the Lord our God.”

May 17

The first Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court was the president of the American Bible Society. Who was he? John Jay, who died MAY 17, 1829.

A member of the Continental Congress, even serving as its president, John Jay signed the Treaty of Paris with Franklin and Adams, ending the Revolutionary War. The Treaty begins:

“In the name of the Most Holy and Undivided Trinity.” Jay helped ratify the Constitution by writing the Federalist Papers with Madison and Hamilton. In 1777, John Jay told an Ulster County Grand Jury: “The Americans are the first people whom Heaven has favoured with an opportunity of…choosing the forms of government under which they should live…The convention by whom that Constitution was formed were of opinion that the gospel of Christ, like the ark of God, would not fall, though unsupported by the arm of flesh.” To the New York Convention, December 23, 1776, John Jay said: “When you have done all things, then rely upon the good Providence of Almighty God for success, in full confidence that without his blessings, all our efforts will inevitably fail…The Holy Gospels are yet to be preached to these western regions, and we have the highest reason to believe that the Almighty will not suffer slavery and the gospel to go hand in hand. It cannot, it will not be.”

Writing to John Bristed, April 23, 1811, John Jay recounted: “An atheist very abruptly remarked that there was no God, and he hoped the time would come when there would be no religion in the world. I very concisely remarked that if there was no God there could be no moral obligations, and I did not see how society could subsist without them.” On October 12, 1816, John Jay stated: “Providence has given to our people the choice of their rulers, and it is the duty, as well as the privilege and interest of our Christian nation to select and prefer Christians for their rulers.”

On May 17, 1829, as he was dying, John Jay was asked if he had any last words for his children.

He replied: “They have the Book.”

Thomas Jefferson was a very remarkable man who started learning very early in life and never stopped.

  • At 5, began studying under his cousins’ tutor.
  • At 9, studied Latin, Greek and French.
  • At 14, studied classical literature and additional languages.
  • At 16, entered the College of William and Mary.
  • At 19, studied Law for 5 years starting under George Wythe.
  • At 23, started his own law practice.
  • At 25, was elected to the Virginia House of Burgesses.
  • At 31, wrote the widely circulated “Summary View of the Rights of British America” and retired from his law practice.
  • At 32, was a Delegate to the Second Continental Congress.
  • At 33, wrote the Declaration of Independence.
  • At 33, took three years to revise Virginia ‘s legal code and wrote a Public Education bill and a statute for Religious Freedom.
  • At 36, was elected the second Governor of Virginia succeeding Patrick Henry.
  • At 40, served in Congress for two years.
  • At 41, was the American minister to France and negotiated commercial treaties with European nations along with Ben Franklin and John Adams.
  • At 46, served as the first Secretary of State under George Washington.
  • At 53, served as Vice President and was elected president of the American Philosophical Society.
  • At 55, drafted the Kentucky Resolutions and became the active head of Republican Party.
  • At 57, was elected the third president of the United States .
  • At 60, obtained the Louisiana Purchase doubling the nation’s size.
  • At 61, was elected to a second term as President.
  • At 65, retired to Monticello .
  • At 80, helped President Monroe shape the Monroe Doctrine.
  • At 81, almost single-handedly created the University of Virginia and served as its first president.
  • At 83, died on the 50th anniversary of the Signing of the Declaration of Independence along with John Adams.

Thomas Jefferson knew what he was talking about because he-himself studied the previous failed attempts at government.

He understood actual history, the nature of God, his laws and the nature of man.

That happens to be waaay more than what most understand today. Jefferson really knew his stuff.

A voice from the past to lead us in the future:

John F. Kennedy held a dinner in the white House for a group of the brightest minds in the nation at that time. He made this statement: “This is perhaps the assembly of the most intelligence ever to gather at one time in the White House with the exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone.”

“When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe”.

Thomas Jefferson

“The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not”.

Thomas Jefferson

“It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world.”

Thomas Jefferson

“I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them”.

Thomas Jefferson

“My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government.”

Thomas Jefferson

“No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms.”

Thomas Jefferson

“The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.”

Thomas Jefferson

“The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.”

Thomas Jefferson

“To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical.”

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson said in 1802:

“I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies. If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around the banks will deprive the people of all property – until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered.”

A peer of Mozart and Haydn, he started becoming deaf at age 28, yet incredibly wrote some of the world’s most beautiful symphonies, concertos and sonatas. This was Ludwig van Beethoven, baptized DECEMBER 17, 1770, in Bonn, Germany.

“Alle Menschen werden Bruder Wo dein sanfter Flitgel weilt.” (“All mankind shall be brothers where thy gentle wings abide.”) Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy” is also used as the tune of Princeton professor Henry Van Dyke’s hymn “Joyful, Joyful We Adore Thee.”

In 1801, Beethoven, being deaf, wrote:

“No friend have I. I must live by myself alone; but I know well that God is nearer to me than others in my art, so I will walk fearlessly with Him.” Supreme Court Justice Jackson wrote in McCollum v. Board of Education, 1948: “It would not seem practical to teach…the arts if we are to forbid exposure of youth to any religious influences.

Music without sacred music…would be…incomplete, even from a secular point of view.”

November 29

His death went unnoticed, as he died the same day John F. Kennedy was shot, but his works are some of the most widely read in English literature. Originally an agnostic, he served in World War I and became a professor at Oxford and Cambridge. He credits his Catholic friend and fellow writer, J.R.R. Tolkien, author of “Lord of the Rings,” as being instrumental in bringing him to faith in Christ. Among his most notable books are: The Screwtape Letters; Miracles; The Problem of Pain; Abolition of Man; and The Chronicles of Narnia, which include The Lion, Witch and Wardrobe.

His name was C.S. Lewis, born NOVEMBER 29, 1898.

Over 200 million copies of his books have sold worldwide and, 40 years after his death, continue to sell a million copies a year. In Mere Christianity, C.S. Lewis wrote:

“All that we call human history – money, poverty, ambition, war, prostitution, classes, empires, slavery – is the long terrible story of man trying to find something other than God which will make him happy.”

C.S. Lewis wrote:

“Christianity…is a religion you could not have guessed…It is not the sort of thing anyone would have made up. It has just that queer twist about it that real things have.”

Alexander Solzhenitsyn was born in Russia, DECEMBER 11, 1918. He was arrested for writing a letter criticizing Joseph Stalin and spent eleven years in prisons and labor camps. He began writing and eventually received the Nobel Prize for Literature. Solzhenitsyn wrote:

“At the height of Stalin’s terror in 1937-38…more than 40,000 persons were shot per month…Over there people are groaning and dying and in psychiatric hospitals. Doctors are making their evening rounds, injecting people with drugs which destroy their brain cells.”

You know the words from the Bible: ‘Build not on sand, but on rock….

Lenin’s teachings are that anyone is considered to be a fool who doesn’t take what’s lying in front of him. “If you can take it, take it. If you can attack, attack.”

“But if there’s a wall, then go back.”

“And the Communist leaders respect only firmness and have contempt and laugh at persons who continually give in to them. America…they are trying to weaken you; they are trying to disarm your strong and magnificent country…I call upon you: ordinary working men of America…do not let yourselves become weak.”

December 21

“Amazing grace! How sweet the sound, That saved a wretch like me! I once was lost, but now am found, Was blind, but now I see.”

These were the words of John Newton, a former slave ship captain, who died DECEMBER 21, 1807. At age 11, his mother died and he went to sea with his father. He fell in love with Mary Catlett while on shore leave, but overstaying his visit, he missed his ship’s departure and was pressed by a gang onto the HMS Harwich. His reckless behavior caused him to be traded to a slave ship. While on a West African plantation buying slaves, his employer enslaved him. He was rescued, but continued his immoral life, deriding Christians with blasphemy that shocked even sailors.

During a storm that nearly sank them, he first prayed.

He read Thomas a Kempis’ ‘Imitation of Christ,’ left the slave-trade and became a minister, preaching the rest of his life against slavery. Having encouraged William Wilberforce to end slavery in England, his tombstone read,

“John Newton, Clerk, once an infidel and libertine, a servant of slaves in Africa, was, by the rich mercy of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, preserved, restored, pardoned, and appointed to preach the faith he had long labored to destroy.”

June 24th,

His travels were exceeded only by Lewis and Clark. He led expeditions up the Missouri River with such characters as keelboatman Mike Fink. He discovered the South Pass through the Rockies and the first land route to California. He led settlers across the Santa Fe Trail, the Mojave Desert, the Sierra Nevadas and up the Oregon Coast.

His name was Jedediah Smith, born JUNE 24, 1798.

Jedediah operated a successful fur trading company out of Salt Lake City. Jedediah noted in his Journal: “Then let us come forward with faith, nothing doubting, and He will most unquestionably hear us.” On December 24, 1829, from Wind River on the east side of the Rocky Mountains, Jedediah Smith wrote to his parents in Ohio: “It is a long time since I left home & many times I have been ready, to bring my business to a close & endeavor to come home; but have been hindered hitherto…However I will endeavor, by the assistance of Divine Providence, to come home as soon as possible…but whether I shall ever be allowed the privilege, God only knows. I feel the need of the watch & care of a Christian Church.

You may well suppose that our Society is of the roughest kind. Men of good morals seldom enter into business of this kind-I hope you will remember me before the Throne of Grace…

May God in His infinite mercy allow me soon to join My Parents is the Prayer of your undutiful Son, Jedediah S. Smith.”

In a letter to his brother, Ralph, December 24, 1829, Jedediah Smith

wrote:

“Many Hostile tribes of Indians inhabit this Space…In August 1827, ten Men who were in company with me lost their lives by the Amuchabas Indians…In July 1828, fifteen men who were in company with me lost their lives by the Umpquah Indians…Many others have lost their lives in different parts…

My Brother…I have need of your Prayers…to bear me up before the Throne of Grace.” On May 27, 1831, Jedediah Smith was ambushed by Comanches near Sante Fe and killed.

Just four months earlier, January 26, 1831, Jedediah Smith wrote to his brother Ralph in Wayne County, Ohio: “Some, who have made a profession of Christianity & have by their own negligence caused the Spirit to depart, think their day of grace is over; but where did they find Such doctrine? I find our Saviour ever entreating & wooing us.”

 

July 31

On his third voyage, Columbus sailed south along the west coast of Africa and was caught in the doldrums, a notorious condition of no winds and intense heat. After drifting aimlessly for eight days and running low on water, Columbus vowed if the winds returned, he would name the first land he saw after the Holy Trinity.

The winds returned and on JULY 31, 1498, he sighted an island off the coast of Venezuela which coincidentally had three peaks. He named it Trinidad.

Columbus obtained fresh water for his sailors and in the process was the first European to see South America.

Booker T. Washington referred to a similar story at the Atlanta Exposition,

September 18, 1895:

“A ship lost at sea for many days suddenly sighted a friendly vessel.

From the mast of the unfortunate vessel was seen a signal, ‘Water, water; we die of thirst!’

The answer from the friendly vessel at once came back, ‘Cast down your bucket where you are.’…The captain of the distressed vessel, at last heeding the injunction, cast down his bucket, and it came up full of fresh, sparkling water from the mouth of the Amazon River.”

“I would say ‘Cast down your bucket where you are’…making friends of the people of all races by whom we are surrounded.”

9.

Greatest Men! Missionaries of THE Kingdom…

August 9

In 1831, three Nez Perce Indians and one Flathead Indian, traveled from the Oregon Territory to St. Louis, Missouri, looking for the “book to heaven.” Bishop of St. Louis, Rev. Joseph Rosati (1789-1843), wrote in the annals of the Association of the Propagation of the Faith, December 31, 1831:

“Some three months ago four Indians who live across the Rocky Mountains near the Columbia River (Clark’s Fork of the Columbia) arrived at St. Louis. After visiting General Clark who, in his celebrated travels, has visited their country…they came to see our church and appeared to be exceedingly well pleased with it…Two of our priests visited them…

They made the sign of the Cross and other signs which appeared to have some relation to baptism. The sacrament was administered to them.”

Wyandot Indian chief, William Walker (1800-1874), met the Indians at the home of Territorial Governor William Clark, of the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1805-1806).

His account was printed, March 1, 1833, in the “Christian Advocate & Journal and Zion’s Herald of New York,” a Methodist Episcopal publication which at the time had the largest circulation of any periodical in the world: “Immediately after we landed in St. Louis, on our way to the west, I proceeded to Gen. Clark’s, superintendent of Indian affairs…While in his office…he informed me that three chiefs from the Flat-Head nation were in his house, and were quite sick, and that one (the fourth) had died a few days ago.

They were from the west of the Rocky Mountains. Curiosity prompted me to step into the adjoining room to see them, having never seen any, but often heard of them. I was struck by their appearance…

The distance they had traveled on foot was nearly three thousand miles to see Gen. Clarke, their great father, as they called him, he being the first American officer they ever became acquainted with…”

William Walker continued:

“Gen. C. related to me the object of their mission, and, my dear friend, it is impossible for me to describe to you my feelings while listening to his narrative…(They had heard) the white people away toward the rising of the sun had been put in possession of the true mode of worshiping the great Spirit. They had a book containing directions how to conduct themselves in order to enjoy his favor and hold converse with him; and with this guide, no one need go astray, but every one that would follow the directions laid down there, could enjoy, in this life, his favor; and after death would be received into the country where the great Spirit resides, and live for ever with him. Upon receiving this information, they called a national council to take this subject into consideration…They accordingly deputed four of their chiefs to proceed to St. Louis to see their great father, Gen. Clarke, to inquire of him…”

William Walker wrote further:

“They arrived at St. Louis, and presented themselves to Gen. C. the latter was somewhat puzzled being sensible of the responsibility that rested on him; he however proceeded by informing them that what they had been told by the white man in their own country, was true. Then went into a succinct history of man, from his creation down to the advent of the Saviour; explained to them all the moral precepts contained in the Bible, expounded to them the decalogue. Informed them of the advent of the Saviour, his life, precepts, his death, resurrection, ascension, and the relation he now stands to man as a mediator-that he will judge the world, & c.” The publishing of William Walker’s account inspired Dr. Marcus Whitman to leave Massachusetts and became a missionary to the Indians of Oregon and Washington. President Warren G. Harding, dedicating the Oregon Trail Monument, July 3, 1923, recounted how Dr. Marcus Whitman traveled, clad in buckskin breeches, fur leggings and moccasins, “in the dead of winter 1842, struggled through…blinding storms, 4,000 miles…from Walla Walla…past the Great Salt Lake, to Santa Fe…to St. Louis and finally…to Washington, D.C…

It was a race against time. Public opinion was…that Oregon was not worth claiming…

Turning to President Tyler, Whitman added…’All I ask is that you will not barter away Oregon or allow English interference until I can lead…settlers across the plains.'”

“Such was Marcus Whitman, the missionary hero…to plead that the state should acquire…the empire that the churches were gaining for Christianity…” “Never in the history of the world has there been a finer example of civilization following Christianity. The missionaries led under the banner of the cross and the settlers moved close behind under the star-spangled symbol of the nation.”

The State of Washington placed the statue of Dr. Marcus Whitman in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall.

10.

Christianity and Science

They Mesh Beautifully, and back in the day (the late 1900’s and early 20th century) the classical education held that Theology, the study of God, to be the “Queen of the Sciences”, for without a proper context of the study of the natural world science would have no meaning.

Science truly is the seeking out of hidden processes and things within the natural world that reveal the Creator’s magnificence.

Proverbs 25:2 English Standard Version (ESV)

2It is the glory of God to  conceal things,

  but the glory of kings is to search things out.

August 25

He discovered planet Uranus in 1781 and desired to name it after King George III, though others gave it his name, as Thomas Jefferson’s wrote from Paris to John Page, August 20, 1785: “You will find in these the tables for the planet Herschel, as far as the observations hitherto made…You will see…that Herschel was…the first astronomer who discovered it to be a planet.”

Previously a music teacher and bandleader, Sir William Herschel identified double-stars, coined the word “asteroid,” meaning star-like, discovered infrared radiation and constructed the largest reflecting telescopes of his day to catalogue thousands of nebulae and galaxies.

Knighted by King George, he died in his observatory, AUGUST 25, 1822. Of the heavens, Sir William Herschel stated:

“The undevout astronomer must be mad.”

His son, Sir John Frederick Herschel, took his father’s telescope to the southern hemisphere where he catalogued hundreds of new stars and nebulae. Of the Bible, Sir John Frederick Herschel wrote: “All human discoveries seem to be made only for the purpose of confirming more and more strongly the truths that come from on high and are contained in the Sacred Writings.”

The Flash Mob Mentality of Scientific Inquiry

by  Ann Coulter 08/24/2011

The definition of hell is being condescended to by idiots. It will probably be MSNBC’s Chris Matthews and Contessa Brewer sneering at you for all of eternity for not believing in evolution.

Roughly one-third of my 2007 No. 1 New York Times best-seller, “Godless: The Church of Liberalism,” is an attack on liberals’ creation myth, Darwinian evolution. I presented the arguments of all the luminaries in the field, from the retarded Richard Dawkins to the brilliant Francis Crick, and disputed them.

But apparently liberals didn’t want to argue back.

Despite Matthews’ obsessive fixation on the topic, manifested by his constantly asking elected Republicans if they believe in evolution, in a one-hour interview with me on “Godless” — the very book that is chockablock with attacks on Darwinism — Matthews didn’t ask me a single question about the subject.

No liberal did. Matthews doesn’t even know what evolution is.

Just a year later, at a 2008 Republican presidential candidates’ debate, Matthews asked for a show of hands of who believed in evolution. No discussion permitted! That might allow scientific facts, rather than schoolyard taunts, to escape into the world.

Evolution is the only subject that is discussed exclusively as a “Do you believe?” question with yes-or-no answers. How about conservative journalists start putting mikes in front of liberal candidates and demanding, “Do you believe in the Bible — yes or no?” “Is an unborn baby human — yes or no?” and “Do you believe teenagers should have sex — yes or no?”

This is the flash mob method of scientific inquiry. Liberals quickly surround and humiliate anyone who disagrees with them. They are baffled when appeals to status (which would work on them) don’t work on everyone else.

Now that Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry has said there are “gaps” in the theory of evolution — or “gas” as The New York Times originally reported, before issuing a correction — we’re in for another round of fact-free mocking of fundamentalist nuts.

In fact, however, it has not been advances in Christianity (which is pretty much settled), but in science that have completely discredited Darwin’s theory of evolution.

This week, we will consider one small slice of the mountain of scientific evidence disproving this mystery religion from the Victorian age.

Most devastating for the Darwiniacs were advances in microbiology since Darwin’s time, revealing infinitely complex mechanisms requiring hundreds of parts working together at once — complex cellular structures, DNA, blood-clotting mechanisms, molecules, and the cell’s tiny flagellum and cilium.

Darwin’s theory was that life on Earth began with single-celled life forms, which by random mutation, sex and death, would pass on the desirable mutations, and this process, over billions of years, would lead to the creation of new species.

The (extremely generous) test Darwin set for his theory was this: “If it could be demonstrated that any complex organ existed which could not possibly have been formed by numerous, successive, slight modifications, my theory would absolutely break down.”

Thanks to advances in microscopes, thousands of such complex mechanisms have been found since Darwin’s day. He had to explain only simple devices, such as beaks and gills. If Darwin were able to come back today and peer through a modern microscope to see the inner workings of a cell, he would instantly abandon his own theory.

It is a mathematical impossibility, for example, that all 30 to 40 parts of the cell’s flagellum — forget the 200 parts of the cilium! — could all arise at once by random mutation. According to most scientists, such an occurrence is considered even less likely than John Edwards marrying Rielle Hunter, the “ground zero” of the impossible.

Nor would each of the 30 to 40 parts individually make an organism more fit to survive and reproduce, which, you will recall, is the lynchpin of the whole contraption.

As Michael Behe, biochemist and author of “Darwin’s Black Box,” explains, even a mechanism as simple as a three-part mousetrap requires all three parts to be working together at once. Otherwise, you don’t get a mousetrap that catches half as many mice — and thus might win a survival of the fittest competition — you don’t get a mousetrap at all.

The more we have learned about molecules, cells and DNA — a body of knowledge some refer to as “science” — the more preposterous Darwin’s theory has become. DNA is, as Bill Gates says, “like a computer program, but far, far more advanced than any software we’ve ever created.” (Plus DNA doesn’t usually crash when you’re right in the middle of reproducing.)

Evolution fanatics would rather not be called on to explain these complex mechanisms that Darwin himself said would disprove his theory.

Instead they make jokes about people who know the truth. They say that to dispute evolution means you must believe man walked with dinosaurs.

Galileo’s persecutors probably had some good guffaws about him believing in Fred Flintstone.

This is why the brighter Darwiniacs end up sounding like Scientologists in order to cling to their mystery religion.

Crick, winner of the Nobel Prize for his co-discovery of DNA, hypothesized that highly intelligent extraterrestrials sent living cells to Earth on an unmanned spaceship, a theory he set forth in his 1981 book, “Life Itself.”

Thus was God narrowly averted!

But Crick’s solution obviously begs the question: How did the highly intelligent extraterrestrials evolve?

Harvard population biologist Richard Lewontin said the Darwiniacs tolerate “unsubstantiated just-so stories” of evolution and ignore “the patent absurdity of some of its constructs” because they are committed to coming up with a theory that excludes God. “We cannot,” Lewontin said, “allow a divine foot in the door.”

Maybe if we called the Intelligent Designer “Louis Vuitton” to avoid frightening the Godphobics, they’d finally admit the truth: Modern science has disproved Darwinian evolution.

11.

Good Character

“A good moral character is the first essential in a man…”

— George Washington

“The foundations of our national policy will be laid in the pure and immutable principles of private morality.”

— George Washington

I never had a policy; I have just tried to do my very best each and every day.

— Abraham Lincoln

I hate mankind, for I think myself one of the best of them, and I know how bad I am.

Joseph Baretti, quoted by James Boswell, 1766, commonly misattributed to Samuel Johnson

Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.

William Shakespeare

Transcend political correctness and strive for human righteousness.

—Anthony J. D’Angelo, The College Blue Book

Wisdom is knowing what to do next; virtue is doing it.  — David Star Jordan, The Philosophy of Despair

Character is doing the right thing when nobody’s looking.  There are too many people who think that the only thing that’s right is to get by, and the only thing that’s wrong is to get caught.  — J.C. Watts

If you have integrity, nothing else matters.  If you don’t have integrity, nothing else matters.  — Alan Simpson

“Doctor Livingstone, I presume,” was the greeting NOVEMBER 10, 1871, by New York Herald newspaper reporter Henry Stanley as he met David Livingstone on the banks of Lake Tanganyika.

Livingstone, an internationally known missionary in Africa, had not been heard from in years and rumor was he had died. Stanley, a skeptic, set out to find him and write a story.

He described Dr. Livingstone as:

“A man who is manifestly sustained as well as guided by influences from Heaven…The…enthusiasm…of his life comes, beyond question, from Christ. There must, therefore, be a Christ.”

Trying to end slavery, and discovering the Zambezi River and Victoria Falls, Livingstone was so loved by Africans that when he died in 1873 by Lake Bangweulu, his followers buried his heart in Africa before sending his body, packed in salt, back to England to be buried in Westminster Abbey.

In his Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa, 1857, Dr. David Livingstone wrote:

“The perfect fullness with which the pardon of all our guilt is offered in God’s Book, drew forth feelings of affectionate love to Him who bought us with His blood…A sense of deep obligation to Him for His mercy has influenced…my conduct ever since.”

— Dr. David Livingstone

“The character that takes command in moments of crucial choices has already been determined by a thousand other choices made earlier in seemingly unimportant moments. It has been determined by all the ‘little’ choices of years past—by all those times when the voice of conscience was at war with the voice of temptation, [which was] whispering the lie that ‘it really doesn’t matter.’ It has been determined by all the day-to-day decisions made when life seemed easy and crises seemed far away—the decision that, piece by piece, bit by bit, developed habits of discipline or of laziness; habits of self-sacrifice or self-indulgence; habits of duty and honor and integrity—or dishonor and shame.” —Ronald Reagan

“Men are qualified for civil liberty in exact proportion to their disposition to put moral chains upon their own appetites.” – British statesman Edmund Burke (1729-1797)

“There is no vice so mean, so pitiful, so contemptible; and he who permits himself to tell a lie once, finds it much easier to do it a second and a third time, till at length it becomes habitual; he tells lies without attending to it, and truths without the world’s believing him. This falsehood of the tongue leads to that of the heart, and in time depraves all its good disposition.”

—Thomas Jefferson

“The malice of the wicked is reinforced by the weakness of the virtuous” –British Prime Minister Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

“We laugh at honor and are shocked to find traitors in our midst.” –Irish novelist C. S. Lewis (1898-1963)

“If you are afraid to speak against tyranny, then you are already a slave.” –author John “Birdman” Bryant (1943-2009)

“Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.” –American author Mark Twain (1835-1910)

Alexander Solzhenitsyn was born in Russia, DECEMBER 11, 1918. He was arrested for writing a letter criticizing Joseph Stalin and spent eleven years in prisons and labor camps. He began writing and eventually received the Nobel Prize for Literature. Solzhenitsyn wrote:

“At the height of Stalin’s terror in 1937-38…more than 40,000 persons were shot per month…Over there people are groaning and dying and in psychiatric hospitals. Doctors are making their evening rounds, injecting people with drugs which destroy their brain cells.”

You know the words from the Bible: ‘Build not on sand, but on rock….

Lenin’s teachings are that anyone is considered to be a fool who doesn’t take what’s lying in front of him. “If you can take it, take it. If you can attack, attack.”

“But if there’s a wall, then go back. And the Communist leaders respect only firmness and have contempt and laugh at persons who continually give in to them.

America…they are trying to weaken you; they are trying to disarm your strong and magnificent country…I call upon you: ordinary working men of America…do not let yourselves become weak.”

It’s not only the right-winger skinhead that’s violent…

“Evil is bound up in the heart of men” (and women) Beware of the Anarchist…

12.

Gun Ownership and the Second Amendment…

“No freeman shall ever be debarred the use of arms.” –Thomas Jefferson

“The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is,  as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.”

— Thomas Jefferson

On cross-examination

“It ought to be a law that people must have a gun in their homes. I know many fine police officers. But we can’t depend on the police to protect us anymore. The value of human life means nothing to [criminals]. If it had been my house [this thug] came in on, he would have wound up at Coulter Funeral Home.”

–General Sessions Court Judge Bob Moon (Chattanooga, TN) advising a female victim of a home invasion to buy a gun

When seconds count, the police are only minutes away…

Excerpted from the Patriot Post; The Following Essay By Mark Alexander:

“A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the People to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.”

—Second Amendment to the United States Constitution

There is no more important constitutional issue than that of defending the plain language and original intent of the Second Amendment.

Justice Joseph Story, appointed to the Supreme Court by our Constitution’s principal author, James Madison, wrote in his Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States (1833), “The right of the citizens to keep and bear arms has justly been considered, as the palladium of the liberties of the republic; since it offers a strong moral check against usurpation and arbitrary power of the rulers; and will generally, even if these are successful in the first instance, enable the people to resist and triumph over them.”

It is no small irony that the latest assault on the Second Amendment is taking place in our nation’s capital. The Supreme Court will announce its decision in the case of District of Columbia v. Heller in June, and that decision will likely have far-reaching implications for the “interpretation” of our Constitution’s most important provision.

And make no mistake, the newly-emboldened Left, with Barack Hussein Obama leading the charge, is gunning for those rights. Obama supports the D.C. regulations because he, “…wanted to make sure that local communities were recognized as having a right to regulate firearms… The notion that somehow local jurisdictions can’t initiate gun laws isn’t born out by our Constitution.”

Does he suggest, by extension then, that our national Constitution can be amended by judicial dictates and local ordinances?

Of course, in addition to serving on the Woods Fund board with Weather Underground terrorists William Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn, Obama also served on the board of the Joyce Foundation, which since 2000, has given more than $15 Million to radical gun control organizations and is closely linked to the Soros Open Society Institute, which advocates a worldwide ban on civilian firearm ownership.

Indeed, the Second Amendment is “the palladium of the liberties of the republic,” and those who fail to support it as such, and reject detractors like Obama, do so at great peril to themselves and the liberty of future generations of Americans.

The subject of this dispute is the Washington, DC, “Firearms Control Regulations Act of 1975,” which banned handguns and mandated that all other firearms, including shotguns and rifles, be kept “unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock,” ostensibly to deter so-called “gun violence.” D.C.’s FCRA actually prohibits a person who owns a legal handgun (pre-1976 grandfathered one) from transporting the handgun from one room to another in his or her own home.

Of course, suggesting that violence is a “gun problem” ignores the real problem—that of socio-pathology and the Leftists who nurture it. (See the Congressional Testimony of Darrell Scott, father of Rachel Scott, one of the children murdered at Columbine High School in 1999.)

Will that decision comport with the Constructionist view (original intent) of our Constitution, or will it be another adulterated interpretation of the so-called “Living Constitution”, the ACLU’s perverted distortion of our Constitution by its cadre of judicial activists?

It is our hope that the Court will affirm the ruling by the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, which held that the District’s ordinance banning possession of handguns is unconstitutional under the Second Amendment.

Though every constitutional constructionist knows that the Second Amendment assures an individual right to keep and bear arms, militias being the people, the ACLU’s “Living Constitution” mob argues that “the people” means “the state militia,” as outlined on the ACLU’s website under “Gun Control”: “We believe that the constitutional right to bear arms is primarily a collective one, intended mainly to protect the right of the states to maintain militias. … The ACLU therefore believes that the Second Amendment does not confer an unlimited right upon individuals to own guns.”

Well, they may believe that, but in the inimitable words of Founder John Adams, “Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.”

It seems the lawyers at the ACLU are always viewing the First Amendment through a wide-angle lens, while they view the Second through a pinhole. Alas, they have it backwards.

In the 1788 Massachusetts Convention debates to ratify the U.S. Constitution, Founder Samuel Adams stated: “And that the said Constitution be never construed to authorize Congress to infringe the just liberty of the press, or the rights of conscience; or to prevent the people of the United States, who are peaceable citizens, from keeping their own arms.”

That same year, James Madison wrote in the Federalist Papers (No. 46), “The ultimate authority… resides in the people alone. … The advantage of being armed, which the Americans possess over the people of almost every other nation … forms a barrier against the enterprises of ambition.”

Similarly, Federalist Noah Webster wrote: “Tyranny is the exercise of some power over a man, which is not warranted by law, or necessary for the public safety. A people can never be deprived of their liberties, while they retain in their own hands, a power sufficient to any other power in the state.”

To understand how the right to bear arms was understood in proper context as an individual right, consider some of the earliest state constitutional provisions both before and after the ratification of the Bill of Rights: Pennsylvania—That the people have a right to bear arms for the defence of themselves and the state (1776); Vermont—[T]he people have a right to bear arms for the defence of themselves and the State (1777); Kentucky—[T]he right of the citizens to bear arms in defense of themselves and the State shall not be questioned (1792). Tennessee—[T]he freemen of this State have a right to keep and bear arms for their common defence (1796) and, Connecticut—Every citizen has a right to bear arms in defense of himself and the state (1818).

These are not references to state guard units as the ACLU insists.

Though the Supreme Court rarely referenced the Second Amendment in the first hundred years of our nation’s existence, because its meaning was understood, in one early reference, Dred Scott v. Sandford (1856), the Court noted, “It would give to persons of the negro race, who were recognized as citizens in any one State of the Union…the full liberty…to keep and carry arms wherever they went.” The implication is that the right to carry arms was considered to be universal right for U.S. citizens.

Of course, Washington, D.C. is not the only major city violating the Second Amendment. New York City has restrictive gun regulations, but consider this comment from Timothy Dwight, President of Yale College, from an 1821 commentary on American life: “In both New-England, and New-York, every man is permitted, and in some, if not all the States, is required to possess fire arms.”

Times have indeed changed, and not in the interest of liberty.

If you know some of those Chardonnay-sipping elitists who insist that guns should be banned, get them a few of these “Gun Free Household” stickers for their front and back doors.

Speaking of Chardonnay, here’s an interesting fact: Alcohol-related traffic deaths outnumber homicides with guns by a wide margin. In the latest year of record, there were 12,253 homicides with firearms (many of which involved alcohol) but 16,885 alcohol related highway fatalities. (Perhaps the ACLU should be fighting for a five-day waiting period to purchase alcohol?)

Here’s another inconvenient truth for the Leftist gun-grabbers: The U.S. ranks 41st in the world in homicides but first in the world in private gun ownership (39 percent of households). The firearm homicide rate in the United States was 4.17 per 100,000 in 2005. But Israel, which is awash in so-called “assault weapons,” has a total homicide rate of 2.62 per 100,000.

The National Institute of Justice estimates that Americans use firearms in self-defense approximately 2.73 million times per year. While firearms are used in 67 percent of illegal homicides in the United States, they are used in 99 percent of justifiable homicides. In other words, bad guys use guns sometimes, but good guys use guns almost all the time.

Put another way, smart guys protect their families with “Second Amendment Security”.

On this point, I would argue that gun ownership is not only a right, but a duty and obligation of all Patriots. After all, we are the Militia.

(For good reference pages on the Second Amendment, see Sources on the Second Amendment and Brief Amicus Curiae in DC v Heller, both by my colleague Eugene Volokh, Professor, UCLA Law School. Read Charlton Heston’s comments on the Second Amendment, 1997.)

Quote of the week

“For more than two decades, I’ve opposed efforts to ban guns, ban ammunition, ban magazines, and dismiss gun owners as some kind of fringe group unwelcome in ‘modern’ America. The Second Amendment isn’t some archaic custom that matters only to rural Americans, who find solace in firearms out of frustration with their economic circumstances. The Second Amendment is unique in the world. It guarantees an individual right to keep and bear arms. To argue anything else is to reject the clear meaning of our Founding Fathers. Self-reliance is the ethic that made America great, and our Founders understood that. They knew there would be circumstances where Americans might need to use firearms to protect themselves and their families… The clear meaning of the Second Amendment has not stopped those who want to punish firearms owners—and those who make and sell firearms—for the actions of criminals. It seems like every time there is a particularly violent crime, the anti-gun activists demand yet another restriction on the Second Amendment… After Senator Obama made his unfortunate comment that Pennsylvanians ‘cling to guns and religion’ out of bitterness, Senator Clinton quickly affirmed her support for the Second Amendment. That drew Senator Obama’s derision. ‘She’s running around talking about how this is an insult to sportsmen, how she values the Second Amendment,’ he said. ‘Like she’s on the duck blind every Sunday…packin’ a six shooter!’ Someone should tell Senator Obama that ducks are usually hunted with shotguns… The next President will appoint literally hundreds of federal judges, and is likely to have the opportunity to nominate one or more Supreme Court justices.” —John McCain

13.

Enter – The Enemy…

1947 – AMERICA’S TURNING POINT – America Rejects God:

It is clear from history that the Bible and the Christian faith, were foundational in our educational and judicial system. However in 1947, there was a radical change of direction in the Supreme Court. Possibly following this event. There have always been enemies of Christianity but until this event they were held somewhat at bay…

July 21

The Scopes Monkey Trial ended JULY 21, 1925.

John Scopes, a Tennessee High school biology teacher was found guilty of teaching a theory of origins called “evolution.” William Jennings Bryan, the Democrat Party’s three time candidate for President, was the prosecuting attorney arguing in favor of creation. Bryan objected to a tooth being presented as proof of humans evolving from apes. Later the tooth was found to be that of an extinct pig.

William Jennings Bryan was a Colonel in the Spanish-American War, a U.S. Representative from Nebraska and U.S. Secretary of State under President Wilson. He edited the Omaha World Herald and founded The Commoner Newspaper. Five days after the trial, William Jennings Bryan died. His statue was placed in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall.

Bryan gave over 600 public speeches during his Presidential campaigns, with his most famous being “The Prince of Peace,” printed in the New York Times, September 7, 1913, in which he stated:

“I am interested in the science of government but I am more interested in religion…I enjoy making a political speech…but I would rather speak on religion than on politics. I commenced speaking on the stump when I was only twenty, but I commenced speaking in the church six years earlier-and I shall be in the church even after I am out of politics…”

Bryan reasoned:

“Tolstoy…declares that the religious sentiment rests not upon a superstitious fear…but upon man’s consciousness of his finiteness amid an infinite universe…Man feels the weight of his sins and looks for One who is sinless. Religion has been defined by Tolstoy as the relation which man fixes between himself and his God…Religion is the foundation of morality in the individual and in the group of individuals…A religion which teaches personal responsibility to God gives strength to morality. There is a powerful restraining influence in the belief that an all-seeing eye scrutinizes every thought and word and act of the individual…One needs the inner strength which comes with the conscious presence of a personal God…”

Bryan stated further:

“I passed through a period of skepticism when I was in college…The college days cover the dangerous period in the young man’s life; he is just coming into possession of his powers, and feels stronger than he ever feels afterward, and he thinks he knows more than he ever does know. It was at this period that I became confused by the different theories of creation. But I examined these theories and found that they all assumed something to begin with…A Designer back of the design, a Creator back of the creation; and no matter how long you draw out the process of creation, so long as God stands back of it you cannot shake my faith in Jehovah…We must begin with something; we must start somewhere, and the Christian begins with God…”

Bryan continued:

“While you may trace your ancestry back to the monkey…you shall not connect me with your family tree…The ape, according to this theory, is older than man and yet the ape is still an ape while man is the author of the marvelous civilization which we see about us…This theory…does not explain the origin of life. When the follower of Darwin has traced the germ of life back to the lowest form…to follow him one must exercise more faith than religion calls for…”

Bryan explained:

“Those who reject the idea of creation are divided into two schools, some believing that the first germ of life came from another planet and others holding that it was the result of spontaneous generation…Go back as far as we may, we cannot escape from the creative act, and it is just as easy for me to believe that God created man as he is as to believe that, millions of years ago, He created a germ of life and endowed it with power to develop…”

Bryan added:

“But there is another objection. The Darwinian theory represents man as reaching his present perfection by the operation of the law of hate the merciless law by which the strong crowd out and kill off the weak…I prefer to believe that love rather than hatred is the law of development…”

William Jennings Bryan concluded:

“Science has disclosed some of the machinery of the universe, but science has not yet revealed to us the great secret: the secret of life…If the Father deigns to touch with divine power the cold and pulseless heart of the buried acorn and to make it burst forth from its prison walls, will he leave neglected in the earth the soul of man, made in the image of his Creator?…The Gospel of the Prince of Peace gives us the only hope that the world has.”

Then came the eventual banishment of God from the educational system, the minds of the young were now open to perversion. Here is the prayer that was banished:

‘Almighty God, we acknowledge our dependence on Thee. We beg Thy blessings upon us and our parents and our teachers and our country. Amen.’

In 1963, the Supreme Court ruled that Bible reading was outlawed as unconstitutional in the public school system. The court offered this justification: ‘If portions of the New Testament were read without explanation, they could and have been psychologically harmful to children.’

Bible reading was now unconstitutional, though the Bible was quoted 94% of the time by those who wrote our constitution and shaped our Nation and its system of education and justice and government.

In 1965, the Courts denied as unconstitutional the rights of a student in the public school cafeteria to bow his head and pray audibly for his food. In 1980, Stone vs. Graham outlawed the Ten Commandments in our public schools.

The Supreme Court said this: ‘If the posted copies of the Ten Commandments were to have any effect at all, it would be to induce school children to read them. And if they read them, meditated upon them, and perhaps venerated and observed them, this is not a permissible objective.’

Is it not a permissible objective to allow our children to follow the moral principles of the Ten Commandments?

US Senate Rejects God by vote…

On MARCH 15, 1984, the Senate voted down voluntary prayer in public schools. President Reagan said:

“I am deeply disappointed that, although a majority of the Senate voted for it, the school prayer amendment fell short.”

On September 25, 1982, Ronald Reagan said:

“Unfortunately, in the last two decades we’ve experienced an onslaught of such twisted logic that if Alice were visiting America, she might think she’d never left Wonderland. We’re told that it somehow violates the rights of others to permit students in school who desire to pray to do so. Clearly this infringes on the freedom of those who choose to pray, the freedom taken for granted since the time of our Founding Fathers. To prevent those who believe in God from expressing their faith is an outrage…The relentless drive to eliminate God from our schools…should be stopped.”

Ronald Reagan said February 25, 1984: “Sometimes I can’t help but feel the First Amendment is being turned on its head.”

Reagan told the Alabama Legislature, March 15, 1982: “The First Amendment was not written to protect the people of this country from religious values; it was written to protect religious values from government tyranny.”

Would the Primary Author of Our Constitution Allow the Ten Commandments to be Posted on Government Property?

James Madison, the primary author of the Constitution of the United States, said this: ‘We have staked the whole future of our new nation, not upon the power of government; far from it. We have staked the future of all our political constitutions upon the capacity of each of ourselves to govern ourselves according to the moral principles of the Ten Commandments.’

Today we are asking God to bless America.

But how can He bless a Nation that has departed so far from Him?

Most of what you read in this article has been erased from our textbooks. Revisionists have rewritten history to remove the truth about our country’s Christian roots. I, Mary Jones, the designer of this web page, encourage all who read and agree with the words herein, to share it with others, so that the truth of our nation’s history may be told.

“There are a great many God-fearing, dedicated, noble men and women in public life, present company included. And yes, we need your help to keep us ever-mindful of the ideas and the principles that brought us into the public arena in the first place. The basis of those ideals and principles is a commitment to freedom and personal liberty that, itself is grounded in the much deeper realization that freedom prospers only where the blessings of God are avidly sought and humbly accepted. The American experiment in democracy rests on this insight. Its discovery was the great triumph of our Founding Fathers, voiced by William Penn when he said: ‘If we will not be governed by God, we must be governed by tyrants’.” –Ronald Reagan

14.

Evolution, Philosophized…

Darwin is best known for the theory of evolution, arguing that men are not only not “created” but they are not “equal” as some are more evolved.

In his Descent of Man, 1871, Darwin wrote:

“Civilized races of man will almost certainly exterminate the savage races throughout the world…

The break between man and his nearest allies will then be wider, for it will intervene between man in a more civilized state, as we may hope, even than the Caucasian, and some ape as low as a baboon, instead of as now between the negro or Australian and the gorilla.”

15.

Who are our Enemies?

On September 20, 2001, President George W. Bush addressed Congress: “Our enemy is a radical network of terrorists…They hate our freedoms-our freedom of religion, our freedom of speech, our freedom to vote.”

16.

The Scourge of Radical Islam

Earlier in his career, 1897-1898, Winston Churchill fought in northwest India, Egypt and Sudan, serving under the command of General Herbert Kitchener.

Churchill returned to Britain and penned a two-volume work, The (Nile) River War, in which he wrote: “How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries!…The fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog…Insecurity of property exist wherever the followers of the Prophet rule or live…

A degraded sensualism deprives this life of its grace and refinement; the next of its dignity and sanctity. The fact that in Mohammedan law every woman must belong to some man as his absolute property, either as a child, a wife, or a concubine, must delay the final extinction of slavery until the faith of Islam has ceased to be a great power among men.

Individual Moslems may show splendid qualities…but the influence of the religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith. It has already spread throughout Central Africa, raising fearless warriors at every step; and were it not that Christianity is sheltered in the strong arms of science, the science against which it had vainly struggled, the civilisation of modern Europe might fall, as fell the civilisation of ancient Rome.”

As quoted by Stanely Kurtz in “Tribes of Terrorâ” (Claremont Review, 2007/2008), Churchill described Islam as a “system of ethics, which regards treachery and violence as virtues rather than vices.”

17.

Communism – Subversive threat to America via the “religion” of secular socialism.

Selfishness is not living as one wishes to live, it is asking others to live as one wishes to live.  — Oscar Wilde, The Soul of Man Under Socialism

Soviet dictator Nikita Khrushchev said of Roosevelt’s “New Deal” paradigm shift, “We can’t expect the American people to jump from Capitalism to Communism, but we can assist their elected leaders in giving them small doses of Socialism, until they awaken one day to find that they have Communism.”

“A communist is someone who has read Marx and Engels. A conservative is someone who understands Marx and Engels.”

— Ronald Reagan (AKA Ronaldus Magnus)

Perennial Socialist Party presidential candidate Norman Thomas (the grandfather, incidentally, of Newsweek Assistant Managing Editor Evan Thomas), echoed that sentiment: “The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of ‘liberalism’ they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened.”

Alexander Solzhenitsyn was born in Russia, DECEMBER 11, 1918. He was arrested for writing a letter criticizing Joseph Stalin and spent eleven years in prisons and labor camps. He began writing and eventually received the Nobel Prize for Literature. Solzhenitsyn wrote:

“At the height of Stalin’s terror in 1937-38…more than 40,000 persons were shot per month…Over there people are groaning and dying and in psychiatric hospitals. Doctors are making their evening rounds, injecting people with drugs which destroy their brain cells.”

You know the words from the Bible: ‘Build not on sand, but on rock….

Lenin’s teachings are that anyone is considered to be a fool who doesn’t take what’s lying in front of him. “If you can take it, take it. If you can attack, attack.”

“But if there’s a wall, then go back.”

“And the Communist leaders respect only firmness and have contempt and laugh at persons who continually give in to them. America…they are trying to weaken you; they are trying to disarm your strong and magnificent country…I call upon you: ordinary working men of America…do not let yourselves become weak.”

“Obviously there is no need of fighting to overcome this single tyrant, for he is automatically defeated if the country refuses consent to its own enslavement: it is not necessary to deprive him of anything, but simply to give him nothing; there is no need that the country make an effort to do anything for itself provided it does nothing against itself. It is therefore the inhabitants themselves who permit, or, rather, bring about, their own subjection, since by ceasing to submit they would put an end to their servitude. A people enslaves itself, cuts its own throat, when, having a choice between being vassals and being free men, it deserts its liberties and takes on the yoke, gives consent to its own misery, or, rather, apparently welcomes it.”

— French judge, writer, political philosopher Etienne de la Boetie (1530-1563)

19.

Debt and Oppressive Taxes

“A tax cut means higher family income and higher business profits and a balanced federal budget…. As the national income grows, the federal government will ultimately end up with more revenues. Prosperity is the real way to balance our budget. By lowering tax rates, by increasing jobs and income, we can expand tax revenues and finally bring our budget into balance.”

— John F Kennedy

Kennedy suggested, January 17, 1963:

“Lower rates of taxation will stimulate economic activity and so raise the levels of personal and corporate income as to yield within a few years an increased, not a reduced, flow of revenues to the federal government.”

“If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people, under the pretence of taking care of them, they must become happy.” –Thomas Jefferson

“To take from one, because it is thought his own industry and that of his fathers has acquired too much, in order to spare to others, who, or whose fathers, have not exercised equal industry and skill, is to violate arbitrarily the first principle of association, the guarantee to everyone the free exercise of his industry and the fruits acquired by it.” —Thomas Jefferson

“The people of the U.S. owe their Independence & their liberty, to the wisdom of descrying in the minute tax of 3 pence on tea, the magnitude of the evil comprised in the precedent. Let them exert the same wisdom, in watching against every evil lurking under plausible disguises, and growing up from small beginnings.” –James Madison

(To compare U.S. tax tables since the implementation of the federal income tax in 1913, see Tax History 1913-2008. The Patriot also offers a comparison between the FairTax, Income Tax and Flat Tax. For additional constitutional context, read “To secure these rights…” on The Bill of Rights and A “Living Constitution for a Dying Republic”. For additional resources, see The Patriot’s Topical Essays and Policy Papers page and our Historic Documents page.)

“The budget should be balanced, the Treasury should be refilled, public debt should be reduced, the arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and the assistance to foreign lands should be curtailed lest Rome become bankrupt. People must again learn to work, instead of living on public assistance.”

— Marcus Tullius Cicero – 55 BC

Does Cutting Taxes Spur Economic Growth?

Arthur Laffer’s Laffer curve explained:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIqyCpCPrvU

Or, as so eloquently put by the darling of the left, President Kennedy:

“A tax cut means higher family income and higher business profits and a balanced federal budget…. As the national income grows, the federal government will ultimately end up with more revenues. Prosperity is the real way to balance our budget. By lowering tax rates, by increasing jobs and income, we can expand tax revenues and finally bring our budget into balance.”

— John F Kennedy

20.

The Energy Crisis!?

“Is there anyone that isn’t concerned with the energy problem? Government caused that problem while we all stood by unaware that we were involved. Unnecessary regulations and prices imposed — price limits — back in the ’50’s are the direct cause of today’s crisis. Our crisis isn’t because of a shortage of fuel; it’s a surplus of government. …[W]hen they tell us about the conservation — of course we should save. No one should waste a natural resource. But they act as if we’ve found all the oil and gas there is to be found in this continent, if not the world. Do you know that 57 years ago our government told us we only had enough for 15 years? And 19 years went by and they told us we only had enough left for 13 more years. Now, we’ve done a lot of driving since then and we’ll do a lot more if government would do one simple thing: get out of the way and let the incentives of the marketplace urge the industry out to find the sources of energy this country needs.” –Ronald Reagan

21.

Healthcare

Profound Video by Ronald Reagan “A Time for Choosing”

www.youtube.com/v/fRdLpem-AAs&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0′

22.

Welfare – State Sponsored…

“I am for doing good to the poor, but I differ in opinion of the means. I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. In my youth I travelled much, and I observed in different countries, that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.” –Benjamin Franklin

“If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people, under the pretence of taking care of them, they must become happy.” –Thomas Jefferson

“With respect to the two words ‘general welfare,’ I have always regarded them as qualified by the detail of powers connected with them. To take them in a literal and unlimited sense would be a metamorphosis of the Constitution into a character which there is a host of proofs was not contemplated by its creators.” –James Madison

“Do not blame Caesar, blame the people of Rome who have so enthusiastically acclaimed and adored him and rejoiced in their loss of freedom and danced in his path and gave him triumphal processions. … Blame the people who hail him when he speaks in the Forum of the ‘new, wonderful good society’ which shall now be Rome’s, interpreted to mean ‘more money, more ease, more security, more living fatly at the expense of the industrious.'”

–Roman statesman Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.)”

[A] wise and frugal government … shall restrain men from injuring one another, shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. This is the sum of good government.”

–Thomas Jefferson

“I cannot find any authority in the Constitution for public charity. [To approve this measure] would be contrary to the letter and spirit of the Constitution and subversive to the whole theory upon which the Union of these States is founded.”

— President Franklin Piece (1804-1869)

“I can find no warrant for such an appropriation [for charity relief] in the Constitution, and I do not believe that the power and duty of the General Government ought to be extended to the relief of individual suffering which is in no manner properly related to the public service or benefit.”

— President Grover Cleveland (1837-1908)

23.

Illegal Immigration

The drafters of the 14th amendment had no intention of conferring citizenship on the children of aliens who happened to be born in the U.S. (For my younger readers, back in those days, people cleaned their own houses and raised their own kids.)

Inasmuch as America was not the massive welfare state operating as a magnet for malingerers, frauds and cheats that it is today, it’s amazing the drafters even considered the amendment’s effect on the children of aliens.

But they did.

The very author of the citizenship clause, Sen. Jacob Howard of Michigan, expressly said: “This will not, of course, include persons born in the United States who are foreigners, aliens, who belong to the families of ambassadors or foreign ministers.”

In the 1884 case Elk v. Wilkins, the Supreme Court ruled that the 14th Amendment did not even confer citizenship on Indians — because they were subject to tribal jurisdiction, not U.S. jurisdiction.

For a hundred years, that was how it stood, with only one case adding the caveat that children born to LEGAL permanent residents of the U.S., gainfully employed, and who were not employed by a foreign government would also be deemed citizens under the 14th Amendment. (United States v. Wong Kim Ark, 1898.)

And then, out of the blue in 1982, Justice Brennan slipped a footnote into his 5-4 opinion in Plyler v. Doe, asserting that “no plausible distinction with respect to Fourteenth Amendment ‘jurisdiction’ can be drawn between resident aliens whose entry into the United States was lawful, and resident aliens whose entry was unlawful.” (Other than the part about one being lawful and the other not.)

Brennan’s authority for this lunatic statement was that it appeared in a 1912 book written by Clement L. Bouve. (Yes, THE Clement L. Bouve — the one you’ve heard so much about over the years.) Bouve was not a senator, not an elected official, certainly not a judge — just some guy who wrote a book.

So on one hand we have the history, the objective, the author’s intent and 100 years of history of the 14th Amendment, which says that the 14th Amendment does not confer citizenship on children born to illegal immigrants.

On the other hand, we have a random outburst by some guy named Clement — who, I’m guessing, was too cheap to hire an American housekeeper.

Any half-wit, including Clement L. Bouve, could conjure up a raft of such “plausible distinction(s)” before breakfast. Among them: Legal immigrants have been checked for subversive ties, contagious diseases, and have some qualification to be here other than “lives within walking distance.”

— Ann Coulter, excerpted from:

Justice Brennan’s Footnote Gave Us Anchor Babies

by   Ann Coulter  

08/04/2010

24.

Education

Are you shocked by the state of public education today? I know I am. One third of Washington State students who enter high school drop out without graduating. About education, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and Surgeon General of the Continental Army, Dr. Benjamin Rush wrote, “I proceed…to inquire what mode of education we shall adopt so as to secure to the state all of the advantages that are to be derived from the proper instruction of the youth; and here I beg leave to remark that the only foundation for a useful education in a republic is to be laid on the foundation of religion. Without this there can be no virtue, and without virtue there can be no liberty, and liberty is the object and life of all republican governments.” His other accomplishments include opening of America’s first free medical clinic as a staff member of the Pennsylvania Hospital. Also founder of the Philadelphia Bible Society, a Sunday School Union and a Society for the Abolition of Slavery and a proponent of public education, Dr. Benjamin Rush penned his Thoughts Upon the Mode of Education Proper in a Republic, 1786, where he wrote “But the religion I mean to recommend in this place is that of the New Testament…Its doctrines and precepts are calculated to promote the happiness of society and the safety and well-being of civil government.” “Laid on the foundation…of the New Testament?” We certainly have strayed a long way from that underpinning. Where is the groundwork of our personal education? Is it laid on the religion of the New Testament? If not, perhaps replacing it we would infuse new hope for peace and serenity. What do you think?

— Peter Sinrud, Founder Serenity SeekersJuly 15

September 11, 1777, the Chaplain of Congress, Patrick Allison, brought to the attention of the Continental Congress that Revolutionary War had interrupted trade with the King’s authorized printers in England, thereby causing a shortage of the King James Authorized Version of the Bible, commonly used in education.

A Continental Congress committee passed the motion:

“The use of the Bible is so universal and its importance so great that your committee refers the above to the consideration of Congress…The Committee recommends that Congress will order the Committee of Commerce to import 20,000 Bibles from Holland, Scotland, or elsewhere, into the different parts of the States of the Union. Whereupon it was resolved accordingly to direct said Committee of Commerce to import 20,000 copies of the Bible.”

That same day, the British won the Battle of Brandywine, forcing Washington’s troops to retreat to Valley Forge. In a panic, the Continental Congress evacuated Philadelphia before action could be taken on the resolution.

Five years later, the Continental Congress again responded to the shortage of Bibles by authorizing the printing of America’s first English language Bible, which had been described in a petition as: “a neat edition of the Holy Scriptures for the use of schools.”

Congress, on September 10, 1782, selected the publisher of The Pennsylvania Magazine, Robert Aitken, who died JULY 15, 1802, for the

printing: “Resolved, That the United States in Congress assembled highly approve the pious and laudable undertaking of Mr. Aitken, as subservient to the interest of religion, as well as an influence in the progress of arts in this country, and being satisfied from the above report of his care and accuracy in the execution of the work, they recommend this edition of the Bible to the inhabitants of the United States, and hereby authorize him to publish this recommendation. – Charles Thomson, Secretary.”

Copies of this Bible are with the American Bible Society’s Museum of Biblical Art in New York, and Houston Baptist University’s Dunham Bible Museum.

Interpreting the Constitution of the United States of America

“On every question of construction carry ourselves back to the time when the Constitution was adopted, recollect the spirit manifested in the debates and instead of trying what meaning may be squeezed out of the text or invented against it, conform to the probable one in which it was passed.” –Thomas Jefferson, letter to William Johnson, 1823

“There are more instances of the abridgment of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments of those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations.”

–James Madison

25.

The Overpopluation Myth and Radical Environmentalism

Genesis 1:28 New International Version (NIV)

28 God blessed them and said to them, “Be fruitful and increase in number; fill the earth and subdue it. Rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky and over every living creature that moves on the ground.”

A great video series:

http://overpopulationisamyth.com

Conceived Overpopulation One Reason DDT Perished.

— By Kevin Roeten

Humans killing humans. It’s happened in the past, and will likely happen in the future. One of the most prolific baby-killing machines has been the banning of the man-made chemical [dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane]. Billions know it by its acronym—“DDT”.

Why would so many feel justified with the deaths of 50-80 million mostly children (2-3 million per year), and mostly in Africa from malaria? (1) This genocide is painfully described by Steve Jalsavec in how National Geographic acknowledges huge loss of life to malaria and …the need for DDT. (2)

Some Americans believe the death of African children is wholly justified for population reduction. Evidently, they are expendable. But Malaria is the biggest killer of African children.

Unfortunately, population control activists blamed DDT for increasing third word populations. In the 1960’s, the World Health Organization (WHO) believed that the only alternative to the overpopulation problem was to assure that 40% of the children in poor nations would die of malaria. An official of the Agency for International Development even stated, “Rather dead than alive and riotously reproducing.” (3)

Alexander King, co-founder of the Club of Rome said (9), “In Guyana…it [DDT] had almost eliminated malaria, but at the same time, the birth rate had doubled. So my chief quarrel with DDT in hindsight is that it greatly added to the population problem.”

Jeff Hoffman, environmental attorney (4) wrote, “Malaria was actually a natural population control, and DDT has actually caused a massive population explosion in some places where it has eradicated malaria.” Hoffman continues, “More fundamentally, why should humans get priority over other forms of life?”

A plethora of information is contained in junkscience.com — 100 things you should know about DDT (5). It goes into great detail about how DDT doesn’t have anything to do with various bird egg thinning, and no other country even mentions it. Even the Wall Street Journal endorses DDT (6), and gives reasoned explanations for its use.

Dr. J. Gordon Edwards describes his path from being an environmentalist to discussing the lies of Rachel Carson (8). As explained in AD: The truth about malaria and DDT – Paul Driessen – Jul 17, 06 (7), DDT-expert Edwards used to eat a spoonful of DDT whenever he lectured on it. He finally died at age 85 of a heart attack while hiking in the mountains.

In Townhall – Deadly Environmentalists (9)—John Berlau (Competitive Enterprise Institute) reiterates “Not a single study linking DDT exposure to human toxicity has ever been replicated.” Dr. Walter Williams (George Mason University) discusses a long-term study where volunteers ate 32 ounces of DDT for 18 months, and 16 years later they suffered no increased risk of unfavorable health effects.

To date, hundreds of knowing people are who’s promoting DDT (11) use, especially in Africa. You hear the common chant there “Bring Back DDT!” (10). Many more people and organizations are behind a DDT comeback, including Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), Patrick Moore (Greenpeace and Greenspirit), Robert Gwatz (malaria specialist/ US National Institute of Health), the African- American Environmentalist Association (AAEA), Sam Zaramba in ending malaria in Africa (14), and hundreds of other experts from over 25 other African countries.

The United Nations has revised its population forecast (12) for 2050. Population will likely stop increasing by 2050, and will begin a decreasing death spiral specifically due to factors such as malaria, abortion, contraception, Plan-B, etc., etc… If one looks at population articles by Jonathan Last (13), one can see where population is headed.

It takes 2.1 children per woman to produce enough babies to keep the population constant. The number of children per woman was 6.0 in 1970. Today the global average is 2.9. The United Nations Population Division (UNPD) says it will decrease to 2.05 by 2050.

History and God are likely to judge us harshly. Population control activists need to be told they are killing off the human species.

http://www.fightingmalaria.org

National Geographic, 7/07

Desowitz, RS; 1992; Malaria Capers

[grist.org]

JunkScience, J Gordon Edwards & Steven Milloy

Wall Street Journal, 8/16/07

American Daily, Paul Driessen, 7/17/06

Dr. J. Gordon Edwards, Science and Technology, Summer 1992

Dr. Walter Williams, TownHall

Marjorie Hecht, Science and Technology, Summer 1992

PAN (Pesticide Action Network) North America; “Who’s Promoting DDT?”

AEI (American Enterprise Institute); “Two Billion Never-Borns”

Population articles by Jonathan Last

Sam Zaramba/ Uganda; Ending Malaria in Africa

26.

Creation Science, Resources

Genesis 1:1-5

New International Version (NIV)

Genesis 1

The Beginning

1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. 2 Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters.

3 And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. 4 God saw that the light was good, and he separated the light from the darkness. 5 God called the light “day,” and the darkness he called “night.” And there was evening, and there was morning—the first day.

http://www.icr.org/

http://www.drdino.com/

http://www.creationscience.com/onlinebook/

Powerful Scientific Journal Website from a strictly scientific perspective.

http://www.answersingenesis.org/

Share Button